Archive for the ‘ JOURNAL ’ Category

International Artexpo 2013, (New York)

THE EXHIBITION OF THE ARTEXPO NEW YORK 2013,  MARCH 21-24

International Artexpo is the world’s largest fine art trade show, providing dealers, collectors and buyers with access to thousands of innovative works from artists and publishers in one single venue. Over its 35-year history, Artexpo New York has hosted many of the world’s most renowned artists, including Andy Warhol, Peter Max, Robert Rauschenberg, Robert Indian, Keith Haring and Leroy Neiman. With attendees from all over the world, Artexpo New York hosts the largest gathering of qualified trade buyers, including gallery owners and managers, art dealers, interior designers, architects, corporate art buyers, art & framing retailers and many others. From Europe to the Far East and South America, Artexpo hosts an international audience of industry professionals seeking to discover exciting new works from AE 13-text-1AE 13-text-2-2AE 13-text-4established and emerging artists.

Dear Friends:
It is a great pleasure to welcome everyone to the 35-th Anniversary of Artexpo New York City. With more than 500 galleries and 150 world-class museums, New York is the place to be in the global arts scene. Our unparalleled arts institutions and the many talented artists who live and work here embody the creativity and innovation that defines our City, and that is why we are delighted to lend our support to the Artexpo, the largest fine art trade show in the world. This exciting annual event connects art dealers, collectors, and buyers with some of the best international artists and publishers, while also showcasing works from the top emerging artists and offering seminars on a wide range of topics. We applaud the Artexpo for contributing so much to our cultural landscape and look forward to New York remaining a premier destination for artists and art lovers alike in the years to come. On behalf of all New Yorkers, I am delighted to welcome everyone attending this year’s show to our City, and I hope you have the chance to explore our diverse neighborhoods and experience the many exciting attractions that define our five boroughs. Please accept my best wishes for a wonderful event and continued success.
Michael R. Bloomberg,
Mayor of New York City
.

Piers 92/94, a premier trade show and special event venue in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, 55th Street and the West Side Highway. Piers 92/94 is home to design oriented events such as The Artexpo New York, The Armory Show, Architectural Digest Home Design Show, The Pier Antiques Show and leading fashion shows during New York Fashion Week. The facility also regularly host parties and product launch events for groups ranging in size from small charitable foundations to Fortune 500 companies. No matter your event needs, Pier 92 and Pier 94 enjoy a prime location, as well as established prestige in the New York convention and special event landscape. 208,000 square feet of exhibit area make Piers 92/94 the second largest facility in New York City. Connected by a spacious and welcoming headhouse, Pier 94 offers 133,000 square feet and Pier 92 features 75,000 square feet of contiguous exhibit or event space. Open space, high ceilings and column-free corridors create unlimited configurations and adaptable spaces.

.

AE13-xAn early morning in New York. Artexpo parking lot on the roof of “The Art Pier”.

.

AE13-2Artexpo parking lot on the roof of the Pier 90.  “Carnival” is a American global cruise company, and the world’s largest cruise ship operator.

.

AE13-3The Pier 90. The yacht “Eclipse” is the world’s largest private yacht. The owner is Russian businessman Roman Abramovich.

.

AE13-4Artexpo New York 2013. The entry hall.

.

AE13-5Artexpo New York 2013. The lobby.

.

AE13-6Artexpo New York 2013. The exhibition hall.

.

AE13-8Artexpo New York 2013. The Gallery Pavilion.

.

AE13-10The Gallery Pavilion. Artworks and viewers.

.

AE13-9The Gallery Pavilion at the beginning of exhibition.

.

AE13-aArtexpo New York 2013. The galleries exposition.

.

AE13-16The galleries exposition.

.

AE13-15Viewers at an artwork.

.

AE13-11An afternoon time.

.

AE13-12Painting and viewers connection.

.

AE13-13There are many styles and topics…

.

AE13-14…for every viewer.

.

AE13-18Inside the Gallery Pavilion.

.

AE13-19A lot of artworks.

.

AE13-17Video advertising is part of modern presentation.

.

AE13-25The exhibition at noon.

.

AE13-26Discussion inside a gallery section.

.

AE13-24Viewers and buyers.

.

AE13-27Russian painting in Tatyana International Art, Inc. booth.

.

AE13-zGallerist Tatyana Cohen (Houston, USA) introduces many excellent Russian artists to New York public at Artexpo 2013.

.

AE13-20Art dealers and traders.

.

AE13-29Contemporary art viewers.

.

AE13-21The print section.

.

AE13-22…to buy or not to buy?

.

AE13-30Viewers in the SOLO Pavilion.

.

AE13-34The SOLO Pavilion. Viewers at artworks.

.

ArtExpo13-4Artexpo CEO Eric Smith with Larisa Fayvisovich at artist Aleksandr Fayvisovich booth.

.

AE13-23From 10 am till 7 pm there are viewers, traders, and buyers…

.

AE13-yThe end of a day.

.

AE13-35An evening on the West Side.

.

.

.

.

Artists and Art Lovers. Part 2

Editorial Part 2-4

.

ARTISTS AND ART LOVERS  (2)

The modern viewer is a man not spoiled with opportunities to see good contemporary art. A large, representative exhibition with selections based on creative criteria is very scarce. A gap has occurred between what the viewer sees in museum collections and that which he is shown in contemporary art galleries. The two have nothing in common. This gap disorients and frustrates the viewer. The man begins to shun today’s art, who knows what is going on there … The artist, in turn, can not exist in isolation from the viewer. The loss of competent and demanding viewers starts the process of an involuntary and spontaneous reorientation towards the tastes of the crowd. A chain reaction, so to speak – a symbiosis of degradation.
•  The situation with the painting exhibitions is unlikely to change in the foreseeable future, the positions of commercial players – art dealers, galleries, auctions – are very strong. Many of them are objectively interested in the erosion of professionally high standards. Primarily due to the fact that there are more traders-sellers in today’s art world than artists of a professional class, and many more traders-sellers than buyers of serious artworks. There is not enough good artists and wealthy clientele, so they have to deal with what they have. This niche has been filled with an avalanche of amateur pop art. Sellers try to convince the viewer that this is genuine contemporary art. Today success is on their side.
•  The viewer appears to be the more vulnerable party in this situation. In contrast to the artist, the viewer has no presence in the face of artistic and professional organizations. Being a passive participant in the artistic process, the viewer is not able to influence the turn of events. How can he be helped to survive? How he be helped to avoid becoming a consumer of the products of anti-culture? Obviously, another actor must appear from behind the scenes, the most enigmatic and mysterious person in the art world – the art critic.
•  The critic is never seen by anyone. This man appears on exhibitions incognito and leaves incognito. Critics are loved no more than a policeman of traffic services. They have the same function – competently and impartially investigate the situation and make their verdict public. What happens afterwards: a sigh of relief from some or a penalty for others – is not a matter of the critic’s concern. The artist does not need the critic. The artist is quite comfortable in the art community. They have common interests and shared champagne. The critic is needed by the viewer. Someone needs to lay down the road markings, the particular solid dividing strip, which would indicate clearly and unequivocally: art ends here, and ahead – the ditch.
•  Can the critic be wrong? Yes, of course. Could all the critics be wrong? Certainly. Human history is a history of massive errors and global acts of stupidity. Nevertheless, the weight of yesterday’s mistakes is not a reason to deny criticism the right to comment today. Silence is worse. The human community and the world of arts exist by different laws. Tolerance is a great concept, but for it there is no entrance into the field of fine art. Professional art is always cruel to those who create it. It is cruel to its losers, and to its favorites. The critic does not add to the cruelty, he adds clarity. And those who risked to enter the territory of art, must be ready for a meeting with all stakeholders, including critics.  ©

by Russian Art & Paris

.

.

Attention: Our next publication – “Art Show Winter ’13″ – will be online on February 1th.

.

russian-b-2french-b-2

.

.

.

.

Editorial: 2013

Paris-Picture-2.

ARTISTS AND ART LOVERS

Who and when was the first to call attention to the ability of paintings to enter a dialogue with the audience, we will never know, like we will never know the real name of the inventor of the wheel or compass. And pity, since the name of the first art critic is no less important for the history of human culture than the inventor of gunpowder. Meanwhile, it is this feature of visual artwork – its openness towards the viewer, that determined the fate of visual art in the human world. In order for the image to speak, it needs someone soul. A conversation about modern painting is impossible without a conversation about the contemporary viewer. Critics carefully avoid this issue, but artists cannot afford such a luxury. The artist sees the audience at each exhibition, the viewer is there, he stands next to the painting here and now. Who is this man and why did he come here? Apparently, in order to see contemporary art, he needs this art. If so, then the viewer is an inseparable part of the artwork’s space.
•  In the central streets of Paris, New York, London or Moscow, there are many well-equipped showrooms with signs that have the word “Gallery”. This is false. A gallery is a place where art meets with the audience. A place where a product meets the buyer is named differently – a shop. The contemporary gallery business does not need an audience. Going into any of the galleries, the first thing that catches your eye is the empty exhibition halls. The audience is not there. In most galleries there is a lack of artwork as well. To call work of art that which hangs on the walls is not possible, even with a rich imagination. A person who has visited the halls of major museums, will not buy any of this. Meanwhile, the person visiting museums does not attempt such a task – to certainly buy. Communicating with visual art is a completely self – sufficient process. And the natural question arises: where you can see modern professional artwork, specifically work of art, and not its surrogate?
•  This question is a leitmotif through numerous emails that comes to our journal’s postbox. This question is asked by the audience and it cannot be ignored – too far has the process of degradation of artistic culture gone. The journal “Russian Art & Paris” does not yet have its own showroom. Such a hall will certainly appear, but this won’t happen overnight. Today, we are focused on creating an informational field in which the audience can meet with those artists whose work is noted with features of a genuine artistic search. We constantly provide virtual pages of our journal to masters working in various directions, styles and genres. What unites all of them is the presence of real talent and true professionalism. As to how much interest it arouses in our readers from different countries and continents, you can witness by opening the statistical table of views posted below. In the coming year we will continue our exhibition activities. Artists, whose work will be presented at European exhibitions, you will be able to see in our quarterly column – “Art Show”. We will expand our creative cooperation with art historians and art critics, whose professional interests include contemporary issues. ©

Dear readers, we thank you for your daily presence, for your letters and your comments. We sincerely wish you and your family success and happiness in 2013! Happy New Year!

.

RA&P 2012 Stats 2

.

.

russian-b-2french-b-2

.

.

.

Salon “Art en Capital” 2012, (Paris). Continuing

ARTISTS AND ARTWORKS

The Grand Palais des Champs-Elysées, commonly known as the Grand Palais (English: Great Palace) exhibition hall was opened in 1900 by two major art exhibitions: Centennale, a retrospective exhibition of French art of the 19th century, and Décennale, devoted to the work of artists of the last decade. Artworks by Rodin, Ingres, Delacroix, Courbet, impressionists: Monet, Pissaro, Renoir, Degas and others began the exhibition history of the vast domed hall Grand Palais. Probably, few thought back then that under this glass dome, would pass the entirety of world painting of the 20th century. These walls have seen Cezanne and Picasso, here the voices of Chagall and Modigliani were heard, here sounded their painting… The aura of the place, its energy is enormous. This room must be seen not on exhibition opening day, but the day before, when artworks are being hanged, when it is vast and empty. Rows of paintings along the walls in the twilight of standby lighting, they will come to life tomorrow, but so far they are silent. In the silence, there are only the steps of workers hanging paintings, the Paris night sky overhead, and someone’s shadows.
•  The Salon “Art en Capital” 2012 exhibition again demonstrated a high degree of selectivity by the jury in choosing the artworks. The exposition, composed from works of a professional class, free from the amateurism of contemporary art shows, is impressive, equally whole and strong. The large presence of artists from around the world not only gives this art-show a formal international status, but also advances it into one of the most important annual gatherings of world visual art. As evidence of the fast growing influence of the Salon “Art en Capital” in the world – a significant presence in the exhibition this year of artists from Japan and Russia, countries with traditionally high artistic culture. In addition to the multi-ethnic nature of this art exhibition, the stylistic aspects also attracted much attention. The exposure, free from pop-art junk, did not seem too diverse in style. To speak of a formation of a grand style is premature, but strong centrifugal tendencies were no longer felt. Perhaps the world fashion for stylistically shocking artworks is coming to an end, which would be a great boon to contemporary visual art.
•  The exhibition again showed some old ills as well. First of all, is the obviously long-drawn-out crisis of the figurative genre. A nontrivial, with good artistic taste, figurative composition remains a rarity. The embrace of Munch and Klimt was surprisingly strong and firmly holds modern masters within the artistic achievements of the middle of last century. Perhaps a cruel joke  was played by years of attempts to solve the problem of the present by stylistic frills, ignoring the search for new meanings. The section on graphics and especially sculpture seemed, in this respect, preferable. There arose the feeling that outside the window is the 21 century. Surrounded by artistic canvases, our time and our life today looked through with difficulty. The irony is that this hall became famous by the ultra-modern scenes of Monet, Degas, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, that exploded the once dietary academicism. Perhaps it may be time to recall these traditions?
•  Among the artworks of the presented Russian artists, stood out the painting of artists from the older generation – Givi Siproshvili and Eugene Yali. Refined, with subtle humor, the plot portrait of a Georgian peasant (“One more for the road”) and the cosmic space in an unusual perspective of the Russian steppe landscape (“Steppe”) appeared excellent at the Paris art exhibition. The great success of St. Petersburg artist Anastasia Vostrezova – the Silver Medal for the classic plot “La Bayadere”, was a joyous occasion for all Russian participants. The Moscow-like warm “Coffeemania” of Alena Philippi-Kargalskoy attracted much attention. Interesting were the artistic metaphors of Rinat Sharafutdinova and Andrei Shustov, and the impressionism of Aleksandr Fayvisovich. Russian artists in Paris is also a tradition, one long-forgotten, but not yet gone. ©

Artworks by Russian artists presented at the exhibition can be viewed in journal’s section “EXHIBITIONS”. For a photo report of a few days in Paris, see the section “PHOTO ESSAY”.

.

ARTWORKS

The bronze artwork by Melanie Quentin  (France)

.

“Rue de Paris” by Agnes Guillon  (France)

.

“Le reflux” by Daniel Bergez  (France)

.

“Cote d’albatre VI” by Emmanuel Lemardele  (France)

.

Impressive dynamic composition by  Francine Toulemonde  (France)

.

“Pause pigeons” by Eric Peaudecerf  (France)

.

“La nuit” by Gelis  (France)

.

“Ascese” by Louise Girardin  (France)

.

“Femme enceinte” by Benjamin Georgeaud  (France)

.

“Nouvel an – Maiko de Gion” by Takayuki Uno  (Japan)

.

“Nu masculin n1” by Marie-Jeanne Buffetrille  (France)

.

“Le crepuscule de l’ete” by Keiko Yoda  (Japan)

.

“Faucon en vol” by Madeleine Van Der Knoop  (Belgium)

.

Ex-14To be named.

.

“Fruits au pichet vert” by Bernard Londinsky  (France)

.

“Dedans dehors” by Richard Gautier  (France)

.

“Torse” by Albert Avetisyan  (France)

.

“Aigle royal” by Bernadette Planchenault  (France)

.

“Pudeur exquise” by Jack Brisset  (France)

.

“Intimite IV” by Veronique Laurent Denieuil (France)

.

The Graphic Art section.

.

The Sculpture section.

.

.


.

.

.

Salon “Art en Capital” 2012, (Paris)

THE EXHIBITION OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2012 IS OPENED.

When the 1900 Universal Exhibition was over, the Grand Palais, as intended, was to fulfill its vocation as the fine art venue that the French capital had previously lacked, the Louvre having become too small. Throughout the twentieth century, the Grand Palais hosted dozens of official or independent salons, establishing it is a major player in the history of Western art.
•  The Grand Palais opened its doors for the Universal Exhibition with the Centennale, where the impressionists again scored a resounding success. As from the following year, true to its vocation as a fine arts venue, the Grand Palais was to host a number of other salons. First off was the Salon des Artistes Français, whose academism was dismissed by the avant-garde as pompous, followed by the Salon d’Automne, where the younger generation of painters were able to roll out their own manifesto. Finally came the Salon des Indépendants where Cubism made its first appearance spearheaded by a then unknown Spanish artist: Picasso.
•  At the turn of the century, the Salon was the place where any budding artist had to expose to obtain recognition. The oldest of these institutions was the Salon des Artistes Français (1881), successor to the Salon de Peinture inaugurated by Colbert in 1667. However its unswerving academism led to the inception of the breakaway Salon des Indépendants founded by Paul Signac in 1884, where artists rejected by the more venerable show could find refuge. It was here that artists like Gauguin, Matisse, Picasso and Mondrian came to the forefront.
•  To distinguish itself from these spring shows, Rodin, Carrière, Jourdain and other artists created the Salon d’automne in 1903. It was in 1905 that the notorious scandal of the “cage aux Fauves” (the wild beast cage) erupted. The centre of the storm was Room VII. The strident colours used in the paintings of Matisse, Derain and Vlaminck were all the more shocking as they flanked two unequivocally traditional busts by Albert Marquet. Though Fauvism had its supporters, French President, Émile Loubet, was not one of their number. Warned of the presence of many “unacceptable” works, he refused categorically to inaugurate the art show.
•  Today, salons still have their historic home at the Grand Palais — Artistes Français, Artistes Indépendants,  Nationale des Beaux Arts,  Comparaisons,  Dessin et Peinture à l’eau — are united as part of the “Art en Capital” event. The exhibition of 2012 year was open on November 27th, with 14 000 art lovers attended the Opening Day. More than six hundred modern artists: Americans,  Australians,  Austrians, Belgians, Brazilians, Bulgarians, Canadians, Chinese, Cypriots, Colombians, Croats, Danish,  English,  Finlands,  Greece,  Hungarians,  Israelis,  Italians, Japans, Koreans, Lebanese, Luxembourgers, Norwegians, New Zelandians, Netherlanders, Polish, Romanians, Russian, Spanish, Saudis, Swisses, Taiwanese, Turks and other continue the great art tradition of Signac, Seurat, Pissaro, Manet, Van Gogh, Utrillo, Cézanne, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Chagall, Vlaminck, Giacometti, Modigliani…

.

Paris. Champs-Élysées at night.

.

Champs-Élysées. The light decoration.

.

The light decoration.

.

The evening before the grand opening. Everything is ready.

.

The afternoon of November 27th. The vernissage.

.

The vernissage. Doors are opened.

.

The vernissage. First spectators.

.

14 000 art lovers attended the Opening Day.

.

More than 600 artists participated in this exhibition.

.

Some discussion.

.

The art viewers.

.

Viewers and artworks.

.

Inside the exhibition halls.

.

Talk about art.

.

Street of artworks.

.

Good, old the Grand Palace.

.

The artistic town.

.

View from above.

.

… and music

.

Untill midnight…

.

*  *  *

IT WAS IN 1912…

In 1900, the most important event in the French-Russian artistic relationship was the Paris International Exhibition, where Russia enjoyed an unprecedented place of prominence.
Between 1906 and 1917, a whole host of artists and personalities linked Russia to Europe. Thanks to the inspirational work of Sergei Diaghilev, Europe discovered dance, music and the audacious paintings from Russia. The retrospective fall show that he organized in 1906, which encompassed 750 paintings representing Russian art from the 15th to the 20th century, exhibited the work of young painters such as Mikhail Larionov, Natalia Goncharova, Alexei Jawlensky, Pavel Kuznetsov and Léon Bakst.
It was in 1912 that Chagall’s work was exhibited at the Autumn Salon, and Yakov Tugendhold, a writer for the modernist publication St. Petersburg Apollon, praised the young Chagall, saying his works are filled with “rich fire colours like the Russian countryside images, expressed to the grotesque, fantastic, to the limits of the irrational. Chagall senses the imperceptible but terrible mystique of life. Those are the images of Vitebsk – a sullen, dull province, a modest hair salon, a lovers’ rendezvous a bit awkward under a misty moon and street sweepers, a dusty illusion of life on the streets of small villages. Chagall creates beautiful legends by capturing glimpses of the simple and common life.” It is thus not surprising that, in 1913, the Autumn Salon welcomed “Russian Popular Art in the image, the toy and the spice bread, an exhibition organized by Miss Nathalie Ehrenbourg.” These objects came mainly from the collections of members of the art world (Ivan Bilibine, Sergei Soudieikine, Nikolai Roerich, Sergei Tchekhonine), but also from the collections of avant-garde artists such as Koulbine, Exter and primarily Larionov. The catalogue cover for this exhibit was written by Tugendhold himself, reaffirming that “the contemporary cult of the primitive is different from the one of the romantic era and the orientalism era…. This archaic art, strong, expressive, forever young, brings hope of renewal, ‘rejuvenation’ to use Paul Gauguin’s word.

By Jean-Claude Marcardé.

.

GUESTS FROM THE EXHIBITION 1912 HAVE BEEN ARRIVED.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (1).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (2).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (3).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (4).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (5).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (6).

.

GP 21

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (7).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (8).

.

Guests from the exhibition 1912 have been arrived (9).

.

.

.

The complete reportage about the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” will be published in December 15th.

.

exhibitions-2
.

.

.

.

Art Shopping in the “Carrousel du Louvre’, (Paris)

“CARROUSEL DU LOUVRE”:  300 ARTISTS AND GALLERIES.

In the middle of October, Paris once again gathered artists, collectors and art-gallery owners from all countries and nationalities. Grand Palais, Place Vendome, Esplanade des Invalides, Tuileries Gardens – all are recent exhibition spaces of the International Contemporary Art Fair (FIAC),  with which in the “Carrousel du Louvre” a grand art-shopping took place for the ninth time.  More than three hundred artists and gallerists representing them offered to sell their artworks: paintings, sculptures and graphic works of all directions and genres. The cost of the exhibition space is quite high (the basic price is 700 euros for the wall 200 x 150 cm), but the prestige of the brand “Louvre”, according to the participants, justifies these costs. Within two days the huge underground shopping mall “Carrousel du Louvre”, famous for its impressive glass pyramid – dome located in front of Louvre museum (it was opened in October 1993), was visited by more than ten thousand customers, art lovers, and the merely curious public.
•  The exhibition this year was dominated by paintings for the more traditional purchasers: not too rich, not too sophisticated, aiming to decorate their own homes and not worried about creating a prestigious painting collection. The basic price range was one to two thousand euro, as it emphasized the level of the exhibited artworks: without very serious accomplishments and without large claims.
•  Art objects were also exhibited, although nothing special or new: hypertrophied sneakers and puzzles, symbols of modern banalities and facelessness, variations of the same “Coca – Cola” by one of the fathers of pop art Andy Warhol, who in the last century proclaimed mass art as a simple way to make money. If we assume that visual art is an illustration of the aesthetics of the public consciousness, it seems that today this is the aesthetic of decorations on one hand and the aesthetics of ugliness on the other. And quite often at the heart of this obvious amateurism is the smearing of paints with a sole primitive purpose – to create a spot of color for the interior, without thoughts and feelings. “I am shocked that contemporary art does not allow young people to learn. Today art schools teach the concept, but very few can teach good art technique. It amazes me that while people started drawing almost thirty thousand years ago, this skill has been practically lost over the last century,” – according to the modern French sculptor Mauro Corda.
•  However, Paris – it is always Paris and art-shopping for collectors is always akin to hunting, full of excitement and opportunity. The chance to find something real.

by Elena Bazan,  journalist

.

.

Painting. Contemporary style.

.

This lady is not very impressed.

.

There is always a chance to find something real.

.

The Japanese style has no time limit.

.

In a thousand years archaeologist will see our culture like this.

.

Inside an exhibition hall.

.

Photo essay by photographer Vladimir Bazan.

.

.

.

.

.

“Russian Art & Paris” Art Show. Autumn’12

In the fall ArtShow of the Russian Art & Paris journal, we present to our readers artists of two major areas of fine art – drawing and painting. In the graphics section, the journal will continue the talk from an earlier exposition of ArtShow about the complex and elitist art of etching. This time you can get acquainted with the work of two artists: classic of etching, an exhibitor of the State Tretyakov Gallery,  the Honored Artist of the Russian Federation Vitaly Gubarev and young, talented Saint Petersburg graphic artist Leonid Stroganov. What unites these quite different artists is the excellent sense of style and understanding of the nature and specificity of the etching plate – its possibilities and its limits.

The paintings section is presented today also by two modern artists. One is the professor at Krasnoyarsk State Institute of Fine Art, Victor Rogachev, and the other a lecturer of the Belarusian State Academy of Arts, Olga Melnik-Malakhova. The innovative character of the artistic quests by these painters, the genuine freshness and non-triviality of their view on the world, and the stylistic integrity of their artworks deserve the attention of all who are interested in the world of contemporary art.

.

*  *  *

ARTIST VITALY GUBAREV,  (PROTVINO)

The artist Vitaly Gubarev has long been known. A great graphic artist, a master of etching, a fine lyricist – epithets which no one disputes,  and yet, speaking about the art of this master is not so easy. The thematic range of this artist is reserved and even austere. The number of plots in his works is not too large. Add to that the natural asceticism of the techniques in etching, and it begs the question – what is the focus of the art of V.Gubarev? In what art-field does he lead his creative exploration?  Let’s try to understand.
•  We have before us two landscapes – “Blooming meadow” and “Cornfield”. The most close-up view and a wide panorama. Space on these sheets is strictly structured and is emphasized with several apparent tonal accents. This space, decorative and almost flat in the first case, and expanded to maximum depth in the second case, is the main character in the works. However, space can never be empty, it is always filled with something. Here we come to the most important – to the fringe beyond which art begins. A description of the space in etchings of Vitaly Gubarev is not difficult to give at first sight of these sheets – living. Living space filled with the breath of wind and the smell of grass, is vibrant and changeable. How, by what means, does the artist create this effect?
•  Pay attention to the filigree tone design, clearly visible in the composition “Cornfield”. In addition to the major tonal accents, the development of light spots of the second row literally leads the gaze of viewers through the waves of the shifting field. This is not just a tonal richness, but also an extremely difficult tonal arrangement illustrating the meaning of the work – the endless movement of living eared fields. No less interesting is the compositional solution of the foreground in etching “Blooming meadow”. The vibration of the warm afternoon air, the movement of grass, the nearly palpable smell of summer – all of this is in the construction of complex, sibling tonal rhythms of this magnificent sheet.
•  The stylistic horizon of V. Gubareva is quite wide – from the classical form of “Memories” or “Winter way” to the emotionally explosive “Above the vanity”. Today, the artist is clearly on top of his skill and actively working, so we should not rush with generalizing characteristics of works by this master. Viewers first and foremost need works of art, and not grades, of the fine artist Vitaly Gubarev. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Picture in the text: “Comfield” Etching. (29 x 42 cm)

.

“Blooming meadow”  Etching (30 x 37 cm)

.

“Winter way”  Etching.  (21 x 26 cm)

.

“Above the vanity”  Etching.  (24 x 25 cm)

.


.

.

.

.

*  *  * 

ARTIST OLGA MELNIK-MALAKHOVA,  (MINSK)

The art of the painting novella – a genre which is very rare and almost inaccessible for most modern artists. It is difficult to even establish the boundaries of the genre, to give it a precise definition. Some subtle feature of talent transforms the artwork, which is in all respects traditional, into a painting short story, a picturesque novella, acquiring the scale of an event. And it’s not only about the self-sufficiency of the plot, but apparently in the author’s self-sufficiency, in revealing the plot. The artist is, first and foremost, a man who has something to say.
•  A distinctive feature of the figurative artworks by artist Olga Melnik-Malakhova is undoubtedly, their openness to the viewer. Look how easily they enter into a dialogue with the audience: the charming short story “Duel” or the homely warm painting “Blanket”. The capacity for dialogue as a essential quality of figurative genre painting, is priceless. In the composition “Dream on the grass” the dialogue sounds muffled. You can see the presence of a dream itself, painted in the bright colors of wonderful childhood. No less obvious are coloristic accomplishments of this beautiful work. Extremely bold, distinctly contemporary paintings, with live recognizable characters of heroes. All that transforms the image into a work of fine art.
•  Excellent drawing technique, without which it is impossible to work in the field of figurative painting, is fully realized in the portrait works of Melnik-Malakhova. “Anastasia”, performed in a soft, classical manner, as well as the excellent painting sketch “Alice” – are examples of the high artistic culture of the author, of that very “school”, the lack of which has become the utmost misfortune of modern art. The creative journey of Olga Melnik-Malakhova, an artist generously gifted and promising, is in the very beginning. What exactly is to be seen by viewers of O.Melnik-Malakhova is not known by anybody today, but we will hope that we will be able to see much. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Picture in the text: “Nude” Sanguine on paper. (80 x 120 cm)

.
.

“Duel”  Tempera on Gesso.  (38 x 38;  38 x 38 cm)

.

“Dream on the grass”  Acrylic on Canvas.  (50 x 50 cm)

.

“Anastasia”  Oil on Canvas.  (50 x 60 cm)

.


.

.

.

.

*  *  * 

ARTIST VICTOR ROGACHEV,  (KRASNOYARSK)

A viewer, who sees the work of artist Victor Rogachev for the first time, will be slightly puzzled. At what should attention be directed first? What is most important here? How does this artist differ from other contemporary artists? Where is the key to understanding this painting? Upon thinking, we must recognize that this key has been hidden from us by the artist. Let’s try to enter without a key…
•  Space. A place where the artist deploys his compositional ideas, is one of the most important components of the painting. The space of Victor Rogachev is complex and unexpected, and perhaps the most intriguing feature in the works of this master. In his most interesting spatial constructions, the artist achieves an amazing effect – the effect of a metaphor. “Still life with ceramic figurine”, where everything are the foreground, where the familiar three-dimensional model of the world begins to fall apart immediately, as soon as the glance crosses the boundaries of group of objects that forming its own creation. The color scheme of this composition is just excellent. It is the little metaphor of existence in the infinite cosmos of life. Modern art of still life, shaped largely by the efforts of Cezanne, is an analytical genre. Victor Rogachev takes full advantage of this analytical capacity in the search for new compositional possibilities, and new imaginative spatial structures, each time extracting new meaning from objects that are quite traditional.
•  The style of the artwork. An artist’s own style is not just individuality. To this same aspect of creativity, belongs the creation of a harmonious unity of all the components of an image. The individual artistic style of V. Rogachev, with a notable presence of solutions and techniques from traditional graphic art, is well thought out and meaningful. Exceptionally effective and very interesting is the line drawing in the landscape painting “Autumn. Cottages”.  In the gorgeous landscape composition “Silver Fall”, a fine and wonderfully elegant color design, with the most generalized planes, creates a qualitatively new state and a metaphysics of color context arises. The image of autumn arises, along with its metaphor. This metaphor is strong and deep. The painting space of this landscape is concise and tense, and emphasizes the stylistic excellence of the work, where there are no extra details, not a single extra emphasis. And finally, the color scheme, which is restrained and austere even in compositions with contrasting color rhythms, should also be attributed to the “signature” style of the artist.
•  The creative works of the artist Victor Rogachev are clearly intelligent, and in many aspects, innovative, no doubt deserves serious attention from viewers and art critics. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Picture in the text: “Midday heat”  Pencil on paper. (43 x 61 cm)

.

“Gifts of Autumn”  Oil on Canvas.  (80 x 80 cm)

.

“Still life with ceramic figurine”  Oil on Canvas.  (70 x 70 cm)

.

“Silver of fall”  Oil on Canvas.  (60 x 80 cm)

.


.

.

.

.

*  *  * 

ARTIST LEONID STROGANOV,  (SAINT PETERSBURG)

The modern Saint Petersburg graphic artist Leonid Stroganov debuted in art with an impressive series of etchings “King Lear”. The sophisticated viewer will immediately feel a dissonance because a series of etchings requires quite serious creative experience and of course, maturity is needed for Shakespeare… All right!  And yet… The talent of Leonid Stroganov is bright and obvious. Few artists of this age have an established style and a distinct artistic vision. Even rarer is the wholeness and strong inner conviction of his own truth. These are imperative qualities without which many talents have faded.
•  The bas-relief style of Leonid Stroganov etchings, their intense drama, is realized in full effect in the William Shakespeare series. No less interesting is the dynamism of compositional solutions, the amazing artistic unity of tonal and rhythmic rows. Tonal accents impeccably build the dialogue of gestures in the etching “King Lear – 1”. The complex range of emotions in the sheet of “King Lear – 10” comes from the black and white rhythm of the composition. The determination and non-triviality of the compositional structures of each sheet is very enticing. Determination, without which it is impossible to create a new artistic image or, by the description of philosopher Berdyaev a “creation of the nonexistant”.
•  A series of urban landscapes of St. Petersburg – the city, roadway of which have seen each and every Russian artists, is a difficult task for a master of any rank. For a series, it is insufficient just combination of scenes. It is very essential to have a new quality – the Saint Petersburg of Leonid Stroganov. And on the etching plates of this artist, such a city arises. This is not quite an ordinary St. Petersburg. Dostoevsky is not seen on its bridges, but perhaps Bulgakov may appear just around the corner. This city is still tragic at night, but a little provincial in the light of day. This is a different St. Petersburg. A St. Petersburg through the eyes of an artist from a new generation. This city can be liked by not everyone, but it already exists, because there exists a new and intriguing artist – Leonid Stroganov.  ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Picture in the text: “King Lear – 1”  Etching. (20 x 20 cm)

.

.

“Fontanka. Bridge”  Etching.  (11 x 15 cm)

.

 “Demidov lane”  Etching.  (12 x 13 cm)

.

“Krukov Canal”   Etching. (16 x 19 cm)

.


.

.

.

.

“Le Ballet” Exhibition, (Bordeaux)

“LE BALLET” – IRINA MALACHKINA & ANASTASIA VOSTREZOVA PAINTING AND GRAPHICS.

*  *  *

*  *  *

The exhibition “Le Ballet” of the Russian artists Irina Malachkina and Anastasia Vostrezova opened in Bordeaux (France). Artworks presented at the exhibition, mainly graphics, recreates the atmosphere of the theater world, the ballet stage, and backstage area. First of all, the audience’s attention attracted to the realistic and high artistic culture of shown artworks. The feeling of nostalgia for the real art is clearly heard in the first entries in the guest book:

“Once there was dance…
All the magic and charm of classic ballet is passed on by the softness of pastels. The dynamism, brightness, and rhythm is passed through ink sketches.”  Liaissan.
.
“It is obvious that over time, modern art is becoming less and less thoughtful. Artistic creativity, in my opinion, is undergoing substantial degradation. Sometimes it seems that works in exhibitions are created by people who have not even mastered the basics of drawing. It is therefore particularly gratifying to see artworks of Russian artist Irene Malachkina and Anastasia Vostrezova. There is an excellent drawing technique. The general theme of ballet is exceptionally complicated, but in their paintings we see the real ballet life – on stage and behind the scenes. Irene’s and Anastasia’s artwork is like one more dance, that you do not get tired of admiring.”  Mark Kazarnovsky.
.

“Dear Anastasia! Regretting of your absence, I want to thank you for these beautiful dancers, you allow us to see.”  Dominique F.

*  *  *

Some visual information of the exhibition “Le Ballet” by artists Irina Malachkina and Anastasia Vostrezova is in our section “Exhibitions”.

.


.

.

Artist Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya, (Moscow)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2012 – 2014

Every time when starting a new artwork, trying to get a feel for it, I listen very carefully to how the painting may sound, what kind of sounds and what kind of instruments sound in my image, which melody corresponds to one or another image. It might just be the sound of rain on the roof of an aged wooden house, the singing of birds in the spring forest, the sound of the ocean’s surf. Sometimes it is an entire symphony by an unrecognized author, sometimes bits of jazz improvisation, only heard once; it sometimes happens that the sounds of the bustling city combine in a barely tangible harmony… For me, shape and color are always the musical analogy. The rhythm of strokes, the rhythm of movements by the palette knife when applying a layer of paint to the canvas – is a genuinely important component that determines whether the work will be created or not. Hence I always try to write the canvas in one breath, while the rhythm is still held, especially for each painting.

In order to understand the relation of the color, I first imagine the world in black and white. And only when the canvas is lined in black over white, color bursts forth, filling the space, engraved in black ink. This is a little creation of the world.

Since I can remember, even at the age of three, I was able to suddenly stop on the street in amazement, seeing how the sun is intricately tangled in the branches of a tree or how the roof of a house shines, reflected in the puddles. Precisely these experiences come up now in the moments of writing my artworks, building their emotional aesthetics. It is this eternal sense of a lost paradise, a sharp desire to reunite the past with the present and the future, to make this world a little more comfortable for the soul, to reconcile man with reality, and is the basis of my creative work.
.
Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

.

.
.
FROM ARBAT STREET TO SAINT-TROPEZ

“It was a strange character. Almost contemplative.
This inertia, however, concealed crystal-clear energy.”

“Villa Amalia” by Pascal Quignard                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       .

Taking a glimpse at the series of paintings by Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya where waterfront landscapes and flower still lifes are predominant, one can make a hasty and faulty judgment: she is a young artist brought up in the traditions of modern polystylism. In fact Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya is a mature master. First she studied music and humanities, and then at the age of thirty, passionate about painting, she came to the Moscow Academy of Slavic Culture and enrolled in the studio of Vladimir Petrov-Kirillov.
•  Professional art school is seen in the high level of technique – in distinct, well-thought plots and style of the artistic compositions; in precise characteristics of color masses; in wide and confident paint strokes laid with a brush or knife. She works successfully in chamber genres – landscape, still life. The artist’s still life paintings are always staged and almost all of them are encompassed within a square – “Easter Still Life”, “Still life with Daffodils”. The square is the favorite shape of Russian vanguard artists, for example, Burlyuk and Malevich. As a matter of fact, painters use this shape not often as it is too complicated for classical compositional constructions. In Filippova-Kargalskaya’s paintings the square unites all still life elements in a whole harmonious image. Although her motives are often conventional, she seeks a subtle poetic plot. Such plot includes numerous reflections: about the color, tissues, backgrounds, as well as about the scenery seen from the window. Artist’s artworks are full of not only visual experience but also emotional feelings originated by music and lyrical images. This is a very remarkable feature of her bright artistic talent.
•  Composed works deserve a separate talk. Early paintings were devoted to the town of her childhood – short open-hearted stories about the time and herself. The internal concentration of the character in “Coffemania” reveals the painter’s interest in the human being. The picture’s character seems to have come out of Pascal Quignard’s novel. Extraordinarily picturesque light effect of the reflected evening sun, so typical of Moscow, works as a plot of this wonderful genre painting.
•  An important part of Filippova-Kargalskaya’s art is landscapes picturing modest Moscow views. They reveal excited attachment of the native of Moscow towards the beloved homeland. Motives of the admirable “provincial” capital of the twentieth century, with aged urban aesthetics, are especially dear to Alena’s heart. “Summer in Town” is an excellent example of such pictures. Probably one of the best paintings by Filippova-Kargalskaya is “The Two” from the “Kitay-Gorod Lanes” series. Almost square, sparing of colour, enchanting with sincerity. Nothing superfluous, a simple motive, but its lyrical constituent makes this painting remarkable.
•  Painting landscapes the artist doesn’t hide her love for the art of Vincent Van Gogh and artists of post-impressionism. In the work named “Factory” Alena unusually uses her favorite artistic trick – underpainting with red cinnabar. Light blue, asure and dark blue thick strokes laid with a knife in the red background unexpectedly transform the deep shades of the water and sky into a exceptional coloristic energy. You could find it in all subsequent paintings including a series of appealing landscapes picturing the vacation in the vicinity of Saint-Tropez in 2010 and Saint Mandrier in 2011. Another facet of Alena’s art is water motives. A peculiar veil in these landscapes unites all elements. It includes the joy of colors lighting floating clouds and water, the soft sheen of buildings reflected in the water. The plots are recognizable and rich for associations. Found compositions are like the art of illusion. By eliminating superfluous details and generalizing spatial plans, the artist treats the landscape in such a way that the essence of the created art image comes to light.
•  The most remarkable thing about Alena’s landscapes where all objects are static probably is that they are painted for contemplation. Emotional contemplative basis linked to clear and strict artistic form brings forth peculiarity and profoundness of Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya’s art. It is not just painting but a force that was constrained for a long time and then broke loose. The very technique of painting with a knife and pure paint, saturating the work with intensified color, relief painting as well as piercing red underpainting endow the coloring of her painting with powerful energy.
•  Open-hearted and nontrivial, Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya’s art can be read as some visual diary of a sensitive and observant artist.

by Valentina Chernova, art critic,
member of the Union of Artists of the Russian Federation.
.
.
.

“Bonsoir, Vincent!”  Oil on Canvas. (90 x 70 cm) .

.

With the creative work of the artist Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya I am familiar from the very beginning. She became an artist rapidly, having worked to master the technology of painting within a few years. Others would finish academies and institutes, and forever live within the framework of the school where they were taught. Alena’s situation is different. Fate brought her to fine art during adulthood, when youthful energy and life experience met so well and intertwined. But the main thing is that the author has a gift from above, and this is wonderful that it manifested itself. Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya has her own style, her own calligraphy. Her work is poetic, with an intricate mood and philosophically unobtrusive.

Vladimir Paroshin, the artist

.

Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya was born in 1964, lives and works in Moscow.  She graduated from the Moscow State Institute of Culture (1987). Filippova-Kargalskaya studied painting in the art studio of the Professor of the Academy of Slavic Culture Vladimir Petrov-Kirillov. 

.

.

EXHIBITIONS

A.F-K-Logo-1Painting by A. Filippova-Kargalskaya in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2014. Paris. Painting “Angel in the crown of thorns” received “Prix Paul Lassauzé″ award.

.

AeC13-2Painting by A. Filippova-Kargalskaya in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2013.  Paris

.

Painting by A. Filippova-Kargalskaya in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2012.  Paris

.

.

.

.

.

Russian spelling: Художник Алёна Филиппова-Каргальская, (Москва)

.

.

.

.

Iconographers Drobot, (Paris)

ICONOGRAPHERS: ARCHPRIEST GEORGE DROBOT AND GEORGE G. DROBOT

Drobot Georgy Nikolaevich was born on November 2, 1925 year in Kharkov. He was the son of Nikolay Trofimovich Drobot, and brother of Vsevolod Drobot. Georgy Nikolaevich is the father of Georgy G. Drobot and priest Andrey Drobot. After the German invasion of the Soviet Union in June 1941, he was forcibly taken to Germany, to Berlin as «Ost-arbeiter». At the end of the war he moved to France. He graduated from the St. Sergius Orthodox Theological Institute in Paris. He married the niece of the Metropolitan Vladimir (Tikhonitsky). Georgy Drobot was ordained deacon in 1952 and in the priest in 1953. He was rector of a church in Moranzhe (Department of Moselle, 1953-1955), and then the Church of the Holy Trinity in Montbeliard (department Du). He similarly performed in 1956-63, responsibilities of the rector of St. Spyridon Tremithous in Rueil-Malmaison (near Paris). He became Archpriest in 1974, member of the Diocesan Missionary Committee. In 1960, he took up iconography, and designated temples in Clamart (near Paris) and Murmelone (Marne department). He is the founder of the iconography school, and prepared numerous students (mainly in France). Member of the Society “Icon” in Paris. In 1967, he participated at the exhibition of modern icons, organized by St. Sergius Church on the 40th anniversary of the Society “Icon”. He delivered lectures about the Russian icon at meetings of the Russian Student Christian Movement (RSCM). In 1973 he defended his dissertation at the Catholic Institute for a doctorate in theology on “The Iconography of the Nativity of Christ.” From 1963 to 1988, he was rector of the church of Constantine and Helen in Clamart (near Paris). Since the mid-1980s. he also served in the monastery of All Saints Resplendent in the Russian Land, near the city of Murmelon (France). Since the late 1990’s he resided in Strasbourg (France). In 2003 he became the Mitre Archpriest. He retired in 2004. Georgy Nikolaevich Drobot passed away on November 4, 2011 year in the “Russian House” in Sainte-Genevieve-des-Bois, near Paris.

.

“Christ Pantocrator” (30 x 25 cm) by Archpriest Georgy Drobot
.

.

Son of Archpriest George Drobot, icon painter George G. Drobot met us at his studio in the Petit Palais, located on Winston Churchill Avenue in Paris. In this room, the icon-painting school still works, founded half a century ago by his father. Today we would like to offer the conversation with George G. Drobot and photo essay by photographer Vladimir Bazan about this island of Russian culture in the French capital, to the readers of “Russian Art & Paris”.

.

“An amazing variety of fixations of the mysteries in our faith…”

Interview of the iconographer Georgy Drobot for the “Russian Art & Paris” journal.

.
RA&P:  – Georgy Georgievich, the tradition of Iconography involves continuous adherence to the same canon for generations. How is it possible to found a new painting school by Archpriest Georgy Drobot?

Georgy Drobot:  – It is not correct to speak of a new school of icon painting. This concept is peculiar to historians in art, who continue the evolution of style through time and space. Specifically in time and space – modern icons are not the same in the USA, Europe and Russia, or Greece. For the iconographer, this approach is completely different: it seeks to convey the age-old tradition of the church (canon), despite the fact that the support will be Byzantine, Russian or Balkan. The approach is not based on style, but meaning. I am referring to the deceptive form that often conceals charm, delight, and tender emotion. The canonical icon presents a holy image, an example of which is the history of man, whom we honor, because in his life he embodied the right attitude, the ascent to that, to which man is called – to the eternal peaceful life at the source of love of our Lord Jesus Christ. This is what an icon should portray. To present this salutary admonition in a worthy way, there have been centuries of polishing of the canonical measure, which we devoutly obey. Catholicity directs our creativity to the glory of the Lord, and not arbitrariness. Style undergoes constant change – most important is to be in the correct prayer proportion: Image-Prototype. And then, we see an amazing variety of fixations of the mysteries in our faith and church history with the glorification of the hordes of saints. The iconographic mail letter is like handwriting: there are individual traits, there are historically-national moments: the Balkans, Greece, Syria, Egypt, Russia – all Orthodox country, but how many different temperaments. So the main motive of Archpriest George Drobot was to indicate the Beauty of the Orthodox tradition, while being in exile.

RA&P:  – Who was involved in the creation of this icon painting school, in addition to your father?

Georgy Drobot:  – The very first modern schools of icon painting appeared in the West, during the 30s years. In 1925 year the first association in Paris was created – «Assotiation Icône», thanks to V. Ryabushinsky, N. Istselenov, G. Morozov and others. In the 50s years they were joined by new refugees: G. Krug, L. Uspensky,  etc. My father was also involved in that union, having previously studied under Pimen Safronov in Rome. The first customers were many Russian immigrants and Orthodox churches, which back then where created modestly. It should be noted that even Catholics too, with great interest, accepted the traditional Orthodox icon. In those years, after World War II, communication with the Russian Orthodox Church in the Soviet Union had been difficult for obvious reasons. Now, thank God, things have changed and the exchange is developing very creatively with Russian icon painters. Plots, as in ancient times, are the Virgin, the Saviour, the patron saint and the newly glorified. Similarly there appear icons of Western saints of St. Francis, St. Teresa, etc. First we need to respect the praise of our common blessed saints (before the split of year 1054) that are still revered in the West as in the East Christian world. The Catholic Church has since glorified many devotees that can be adequately represented by the icon. But this is justified only to Catholics. Orthodox people ought not to pray before the icons of Western saints.

RA&P:  – Creating Icons is a complex process. How big is the proportion of modern, including synthetic, materials?

Georgy Drobot:  – Iconography technology strictly observes ancient techniques: they have been tested for centuries! Modern materials are only tempting to the lazy.

RA&P:  – Ancient icons were repeatedly over-painted. How to determine the original?

Georgy Drobot:  – In restorative practice, the technology of separating layers has been developed. That is, each layer of paint is transferred to a new foundation, and is not destroyed (I.Grabar Institute of Scientific Restoration and Conservation of Arts, development by V. Ovchinnikov). In this case, the original paint layer can be very damaged. Laboratory analysis can determine the reasonableness of delamination of later layers.

RA&P:  – In Russia, at present, there is a process of restitution of the Russian Orthodox Church’s possessions lost in the Soviet era. There is a pressing issue about the return of icons that are in museums and require special storage conditions. How do you feel about the possibility of the transfer of icons from the museum’s collections?

Georgy Drobot:  – The icon is the subject of prayer and church worship. Then an icon lives and benefits the believers. A museum is not it place. See the remarkable step of the State Tretyakov Gallery: Vladimir’s Icon of the Mother of God was moved to the Chapel, where there is a glimmer of a lamp, candles, and pilgrims come free with their prayers to this beautiful monument of our history.

RA&P:  – How do you feel about the idea of an exhibition of modern icons?

Georgy Drobot:  – In fact, the icon is not the subject of exhibitions, like any other work of art. However, the first contact often occurs due to exhibitions. Perhaps it is reasonable. ©

On September 27, 2012 from Paris.
Copyright by Russian Art & Paris.

.

The icon of the Mother of God “Tenderness” (30 x 25 cm) by Georgy G. Drobot

.

____
Note: The full photo essay by photographer Vladimir BAZAN is in our section “Photo Essay”

.



.

.