Archive for the ‘ JOURNAL ’ Category

Salon “Art en Capital” 2014, (Paris)

THE EXHIBITION OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2014

Salon14-1In the 9th showing, Art en Capital combines four historical exhibitions dedicated to the fine arts under the glass roof the Grand Palais: the Salon Comparaisons, Société des Artistes Français (the Union of French Artists), Société des Artistes Indépendants (Society of Independent Artists) and the Salon du Dessin et de la peinture à l’eau (Drawing and Watercolour Salon); these exhibitions have remained true to their artistic line of freedom, independence, and openness to all forms of expression and culture. This respect for tradition gives a broad panorama of contemporary art, and is a great showcase for the artists represented at the show, both known and new, French or foreigners in this beautiful Grand Palais, in the beating heart of the capital. The audience meets every year for this event. I am confident that this new exhibition will be held with the same success.

Fleur Pellerin,
Minister of Culture and Communication of France

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This year, the Union of Artists of France introduced the 225 edition of their Salon. These many years shows the relevance and vitality of our union. This year, our exhibition showcases about 700 contemporary artists selected by a jury in the categories of painting, sculpture, graphics, architecture and photography. Different tendencies, different nationalities, freelance artists, open-minded and talented will present their work in this edition of 225. Our past is noted by the names of the most prestigious artists and it gives us the necessary stable foundation to go into the future. Spurious oscillations of the “art market” should not diminish the strength that we represent on a real art stage. Our presence in the Grand Palais from year to year is the best proof of this, for artists, for visitors and for professionals of the art world. At the beginning of the exhibition, we give tribute to the artists of World War I, years 1914-18. During these 4 years our society had lost 120 artists. The Union of Artists of France presides in 2014 over this show. This event must pass comparably to our hopes, enthusiasm, energy and talent, which the artists of our union invested in the success of this exhibition, Art en Capital 2014.

Martine Delaleuf,
President of the Union of Artists of France

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In 2014, Art en Capital opens at Grand Palais for the ninth consecutive year. The exhibition collects about 2,500 artists in all areas. As always with great enthusiasm we take this exhibition, which lasts five days, in the Grand Palais, an architectural gem with a unique and multifaceted world. Like an echo of history in the same place, where for a long time art galleries were held in the 19th century, Art en Capital follows the traditions. In the same manner it is important for the Grand Palais to create different exposures, it is a monument on the stage of world art, as a home for creative people. Through such activities the Grand Palais familiarizes many people with contemporary art. This building also gladly accepts all those who epitomize the dynamism and vitality of the arts in France. Forty thousand visitors come, to discover all this and to support the artists of the exhibition. Art en Capital – the cultural event of the autumn which is impossible to just pass by.

Jean-Paul Cluzel,
President of the Reunin of National Museums – Grand Palais

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Salon14-14-21. The Salon-2014 opens its doors.

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Salon14-52. The exhibition hall.

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Salon14-43. The exhibition hall. View from above.

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Salon14-64. View from above.

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Salon14-75. The first viewers – 2014.

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Salon14-96. The vernissage – a lot of people today!

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Salon14-107. Not bad for a start…

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Salon14-138. Inside the exhibition halls.

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Salon14-119. Cafe inside Grand Palais is masterpiece itself.

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Salon14-1210.  First discussions.

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Salon14-1511. Viewers and artworks.

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Salon14-1612. New-old Olympia…….it is really nice!

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Salon14-1713. Viewers. The first impression from exhibition.

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Salon14-2014. Painting “Attraction” by Givi Siproshvili received “Prix Reijinsha-2014” award. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Shichkov-2-215. Painting “Nymph” by Vladimir Shichkov. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-1916. Painting “Night nude” by Alla Polkovnichenko received “Prix Elisabeth Gallia-2014″ award. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-2117. Sculptor Margot Pitra, (France).

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Salon14-2218. Painting by Masahito Kuginuki, (Japan).

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Salon14-2319. Painting by Milen, (France).

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Salon14-2420. Painting by Takue Higuchi, (Japan).

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Salon14-2521. Painting by Nadiejda Mouly, (France).   Sculptor Yvonne Clergerie, (France).

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Salon14-2622. Painting “Narcissus” by Andrey Shustov. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-27-223. Painting “Yang Guifei” by Ksenia Lavrova. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

 

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Salon14-2824. Painting “Angel in the crown of thorns” by Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-29-225. Painting “The morning coffee” by Aleksandr Fayvisovich. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-3026. Sculptor …

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Salon14-3127. Painting by Marion Six, (France).

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Salon14-3228. Painting by Chu Ren Wang, (China).

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Salon14-3329. Painting by Alexandra Rouard, (France).

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Salon14-3430. Painting by Padoneli, (France).

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Salon14-3531. Sculptor Miodrag Scepanovic, (Montenegro).

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32. Painting by Mutsuro Kimura, (Japan).

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Salon14-3733. Painting by Olivier Lavorel, (France).

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Salon14-3934. Painting by Marie-Josiane Blachon, (France).

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Salon14-40-235. Painting by Denis Rifflard, (France).

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Salon14-4141. Sculptor Chanet, (France).

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Salon14-4242. Painting by Eric De Luca, (France).

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Salon14-4343. Painting by Shojiro Nakano, (Japan).

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Salon14-4444. Painting by Masako Fukami, (Japan)

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Salon14-36-245. Sculpture “Rain” by Andrey Volkov received “Prix Adagp-2014″ award. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-4546. Etchings by Mikhail Kocheshkov received BRONZE MEDAL 2014. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-4647. Etchings by Alena Dergiliova. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-4748. Etchings by Vitaly Gubarev. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

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Salon14-4849. Grand Palais is a lovely home for every artist.

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Salon14-4950. Artist Givi Siproshvili. A short interview to the “Russian Art & Paris” staff.

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Salon14-5051. Artists Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya, Alena Dergiliova and Andrey Shustov are tea lovers. Looks good!

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Salon14-5152. Artist Andrey Volkov explains the nuances of working with metal.

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Salon14-5253. This is recollection of Sisyphus. It is probable a hint for artists life…

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Salon14-5354. It was a nice day!

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Salon14-54-255. Exit from Grand Palais.

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Salon14-5557. The late celebration in the “Russian Art & Paris” headquarter.

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Salon “Montreux Art Gallery” 2014, (Montreux)

 THE 10th SALON OF CONTEMPORARY ART “MONTREUX ART GALLERY” – 2014
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MAG-2014
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Ten years have passed with lightning speed. Light, dynamism, diversity, discovery, progress, are many of the words that come to mind when discussing the development of MAG, a contemporary art fair. Born from a combination of private initiative and the creative spirit of its founders, Montreux Art Gallery is widely recognized in the world of contemporary art as a high-level salon, which offers a wide range of artists and galleries nationally and internationally. In an effort to provide the public with an overview of trends in art, MAG has been establishing contacts with the world of art and culture for a long time. Painting, sculpture, graphic art are exhibited on 8000 square meters of exhibition space. The devotion of our visitors, as well as our members, have helped us to be certain each and every year that MAG should continue. This 2014 thus marks our first decade, and we are proud to introduce today a rich salon. To amaze you, to arouse your interest is our goal that we strive to achieve every year. We wish you a good visit, and we want to thank our partners who annually accompany us in this great adventure, our exhibition participants who bring us their creative abilities, and all those who participated in the development of Montreux Art Gallery-2014.
On the way to a new decade of art and culture in the heart of Montreux, Switzerland.
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Jean-Francois Gaia,
Director MAG
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This year Russia received the right to be the guest of honor of the 10th Salon of Contemporary Art in Montreux. I think this choice was not random. Switzerland has always attracted musicians, artists, and writers from Russia. Many of them found here both spiritual shelter and inspiration, creating some of their best works, included in the treasury of world culture. Tchaikovsky wrote in Switzerland the operas “Eugene Onegin” and “Joan of Arc”, Stravinsky created here one of his most famous works, “The Rite of Spring.” A concert hall in Montreux (Auditorium Strawinsky) was named in honor of this composer. Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy. Vladimir Nabokov have repeatedly visited and lived in Switzerland. Modern Russian culture, due to its openness and diversity, is still attractive for the Swiss. Participation in the Salon by Russian artists Zurab Tsereteli, Vitaly Gubarev, Anastasia Vostretsova and other masters will not only attract experts in the field of contemporary art and culture, but also all those who are interested in Russia, its culture and its history.
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Opening remarks by Ambassador of Russia in Switzerland Aleksandr Golovin to the catalog of the 10th Salon of Modern Art in Montreux.
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MAG-1-21. Montreux, Switzerland. MAG – 2014.

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MAG-2-22. Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-33. Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-44. The vernissage.

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MAG-55. Viewers and artworks.

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MAG-86. Inside Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-67. Graphic arts by artist Zurab Tsereteli, President of the Russian Academy of Arts.

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MAG-78. Paintings of artist Evgeni Yali (left) and artist Givi Siproshvili (right).

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MAG-99. Artist Anastasia Vostrezova (left) in conversation with viewers.

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MAG-1010. Artwork by sculptor Andrey Volkov.

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MAG-1111. Paintings of artist Anastasia Vostrezova (left) and artist Aleksandr Pavlovets (right).

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MAG-1212. Artist Givi Siproshvili in Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-18-213. Swiss impresario Ludmila Petrova, Curator of Russian Art section.

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MAG-1314. Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-1415. Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-1516. Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-1617. Exhibition Hall.

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MAG-1718. Exhibition Cafe.

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MAG-1919. Montreux is first mentioned in 1215…

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MAG-2020. …has a population of 26 000 and 45% of the population are resident foreign nationals.

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MAG-2221.  Monument to Vladimir Nabokov in Montreux.

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Artist Aleksandr Pavlovets, (Dnepropetrovsk)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “d’ART CONTEMPOREIN” MONTREUX 2014

AP Port-2Once, as a child my father took me to an art exhibition. Unlike reproductions, these paintings were alive – there were visible layers of paint and they attracted me to them so much that I wanted to touch the painting with my hands. I really wanted to draw at least one such real painting. I began to study painting, and over the years realized that there are a lot of good paintings; in order to not get lost in such diversity, it is necessary to have not only my own handwriting, but also my own worldview. The work of an artist is to constantly learn, to search and experiment. A true artist should be recognized even without his signature on a canvas; with regard to painting, it needs to bring joy to the audience and evoke a bright emotions. One would agree that there is more than enough grayness and dullness in this world…

Aleksandr Pavlovets for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

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It is not difficult to imagine the poetics of a moment, when Ms. Struyskaya stared with a vague and mysterious glance from the insightful portrait of artist Fedor Rokotov of the 18th century, upon an equally discerning poet of the 20th century, Nikolai Zabolotsky. Fascinated by the image of Struyskaya, Zabolotsky wrote a poetic masterpiece “Portrait”, in which “out of the darkness of the past …” not just a beautiful Russian court woman, but all the beautiful women of the world embodied in painting appeared before the poet.
•  Perhaps this feminine – artistic! – charm of the “darkness of the past” pushed Aleksandr Pavlovets to the interpretation of well-known female images and the creation of a series of elegant paraphrases, starting with the sculptural portrait Nefertiti to “The Swan Princess” of Vrubel. The elegance of his works are sometimes disturbing, even frightening; and sometimes playful, flirtatious. At the same time it is perceived as a reliable aesthetic bridge thrown between the past and the present, leading to the worship of the divine beauty of Women and Painting.
•  The organization of art-pictorial space almost certainly contains an element of mysterious theatricality. Being fluent in the art of composition, having almost “perfect pitch” to the tonal nuances of color, the artist multiplied the possibilities of his talent. As a result – the solid correctness of creative interpretations and borrowing, intended to convince the audience of the need for a grateful modern look upon the classics, and perhaps to intensify the interest of a contemporary viewer to the values ​​of the past.
• Seduced by the female images of the great masters of the past, artist Aleksandr Pavlovets looks with caution and even a certain aloofness at the contemporaries portrayed by him. For the artist they are just charming, seductive models from which to pull away, creating images of “familiar strangers”; beyond them there is only “darkness of modernity”, which may be void, where the present has no potency to become IMG_88796-1meaningful “onetime”… The artist manages to play along with nature, gently flattering her and simultaneously sadly grinning. Alas, the master does not find the proper depth in the women portrayed, recognizing that “his own Struyskuyu” has not been created yet.
•  Habitually we associate woman with a flower, but in his “painting of bouquets” Pavlovets comes from the opposite: his beautiful flowers evoke sincere, almost erotic excitement, because the artist admires them no less than the images of women in classical painting, and creates them with the predilection of a painter-lover. Chardin’s thoroughness emanates from the bouquet of lilac, impressionistic vibrations come from the still life with small carnations, Rembrandt’s golden glow of autumn radiates his white chrysanthemums. Collected in a series, these paintings are fragrant with an extravaganza of color and provoke the viewer to remember the variety of exciting aromas.
•  “Peasant” still life are painted by the artist without a hint of force against nature: with a relaxed and joyful love. Tense and strictly balanced chiaroscuro contrasts, and color Still life with a bottleharmonies force us to remember the dignity of still life paintings by de Zurbarán and Chardin. The fruits of the earth in Pavlovian’s artworks are weighty and life-affirming – like in the paintings of Flanders in the 17th century. However, in his still lifes – the fruits of the rich and disturbing earth, are the fruits of Ukraine.
•  To the sophisticated traveler, Ukrainian city landscape motifs seem sad and not always attractive. The painter Aleksandr Pavlovets can poeticize the heavy with spring moisture, unfussy, stooping in the wind, patio of Dnepropetrovsk. He can breathe a pulse into the classically boring prospect of an autumn street with a cathedral steaming in the fog, with a shimmering gilded dome. He can convince the viewer in the Baroque freshness of a pseudo-baroque motif of the historic part of the city. Finally, he can evoke from the viewer a sense of nostalgia, born by the natural pull of a citizen to the aesthetics of not only the parade architecture, but also the shaded courtyard provincial architecture.
•  And always, in every motif, there is a search for a silent narrative of the walls about something precious that connects the human with the frightening and at the same time attractive urban environment.
•  Not burdened by moralization, the artwork of Aleksandr Pavlovets returns us to a righteous realism, a majestic effect which still expands upon us the art classics. The realistic artworks of our contemporaries, like the of works of Aleksandr Pavlovets indicate that the possibilities of realism are far from exhausted. In art, the realistic creation of the world of images and the reflection of the “world” of feelings are the spiritual and aesthetic future of mankind.

by Vitaly Starchenko,
Winner of the literary awards of Ivan Sokulsky and Pavlo Tychinaart critic.

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Pictures in the text (from above):
“Still life with candlestick”  Oil on canvas. (50 x 70 cm); “Still life with a bottle”  Oil on canvas. (55 x 70 cm).

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Joker 1

“Joker” Oil on Canvas. (90 x 80 cm)

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To give a definition of artistic taste is not easy. It’s not so much for the lack of a tuning fork as in their abundance. Every single historical epoch had its tuning fork, and sometimes more than one. Our time is not an exception – there are plenty of tuning forks, and the loudest one is not necessarily the most accurate. The tuning fork of the artistic taste of contemporary painter Aleksandr Pavlovets sounds restrained, sometimes very quiet, but it is worth listening to. In the soft music of his works, there are very many precise notes.
• In delineating the space of the artistic images of Aleksandr Pavlovets, in finding a designation for this space, the simple word “harmony” seems natural, but not sufficient. An aura of tranquility in still life is replaced by an aura of tense silence in the portraits of women. An aura of coloristic hues interweaves with an aura of light and shadow. Compositional structures are distinct and laconic. The motions of live characters are almost always completed. The openness of female images is deceptive, their lips are tightly sealed. Harmony of rest? The harmony of silence? Yes, probably, but still something more.
•  How can the mystery of Danae capture the contemporary artist, a mature man of the twenty-first century? The charm of an ancient myth? But it has been retold a thousand times and implemented in hundreds of paintings. Interest in ancient Greek history? But the painting “Danae” by Aleksandr Pavlovets is devoid of any historical attributes, his Danae is timeless. Perhaps most importantly, it is the presence of the mystery itself, a mystery of the divine in the earth. The compositional decision of the artist is temperamental and sudden, the main character of the painting is made to be not Danae, but Zeus. No, it’s not just about the shimmering of verticals and gold color scheme (Zeus came to Danae in the form of a shower of gold). We look upon Danae through the eyes of Zeus, on canvas is his emotional order, his invisible presence. He is located at the point from which the viewer sees Danae. The sharply-modern interpretation of the plot is psychologically daring, and no less daring is the painting itself, almost fresco-like by its nature. The composition arranges the image, and the image revealing the meaning. Impeccable graphic slendernessAutumn 2of a sophisticated foreshortening of the female figure, is the only classical element of this artwork. Everything else is art of our time.
•  The painting of Aleksandr Pavlovets is a complex and unhurried artistic search within a relatively small aesthetic field. At the same time, the problems disclosed in such search are exceptionally relevant. As an example – the light and shadow is a base of construction of still-life by this artist, but simultaneously, his a decisive rejection of light and shadow in the figurative compositions leaves an open question – why? It is obvious that the basis of this difference is the different nature of the material world and the spiritual world. However, is this difference sufficient to create two separate painting aesthetics in a single artistic space? To answer this question is not easy and it is almost impossible to answer theoretically. Of value is only answer received on the canvas. The significance of an answer to this and similar questions will be confirmed (or not confirmed) in the works of other artists. The mechanism of artistic search in the visual arts functions slowly, but it has been working without any serious glitches and errors for centuries and no other mechanism is available for artists today. The distance traversed by Aleksandr Pavlovets along this road is considerable and the result is dozens of excellent fine art works. All of those are before the eyes of viewers. However, the road remains the same, with questions which, besides the artist himself, no one can answer.  ©

by Russian Art & Paris

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Pictures in the text (from above): “Autumn”  Oil on canvas. (60 x 75 cm)

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Danae 1 “Danae” Oil on Canvas. (65 x 110 cm)

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Aleksandr Pavlovets, a painter and graphic artist, was born in 1954 in Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine). After graduating from the Art school he continued his education in State Dnepropetrovsk University (1980). Since 1994, he has participated in international art exhibitions and competitions. Aleksandr Pavlovets lives and works in Dnepropetrovsk.

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Russian spelling: Художник Александр Павловец, (Днепропетровск)
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International Artexpo 2014, (New York)

 

THE EXHIBITION OF THE ARTEXPO NEW YORK 2014,  APRIL 4-6

For thirty-five years and counting, Artexpo has been changing the way people buy and sell art. Our annual, juried expo brings the biggest publishers, galleries and collectors face to face with hundreds of established and emerging artists. In short, we’re the world’s largest fine art marketplace.
•  This year, International Artexpo host over 400+ innovative exhibiting artists, galleries and publishers from across the globe, showcasing exciting original artwork, prints, paintings, drawings, sculpture, photography, ceramics, giclee, lithographs, glass works and more—all under one roof at Pier 94.
•  Each year thousands of art industry insiders flock to Artexpo New York in search of the art and artists that will shape trends in galleries worldwide. Hosting more than 15,000 avid art enthusiasts annually, we’re the largest international gathering of qualified trade buyers—including gallery owners and managers, art dealers, interior designers, architects, corporate art buyers and art & framing retailers.

 


Piers 92/94, a premier trade show and special event venue in the heart of Midtown Manhattan, 55th Street and the West Side Highway. Piers 92/94 is home to design oriented events such as The Artexpo New York, The Armory Show, Architectural Digest Home Design Show, The Pier Antiques Show and leading fashion shows during New York Fashion Week. The facility also regularly host parties and product launch events for groups ranging in size from small charitable foundations to Fortune 500 companies. No matter your event needs, Pier 92 and Pier 94 enjoy a prime location, as well as established prestige in the New York convention and special event landscape. 208,000 square feet of exhibit area make Piers 92/94 the second largest facility in New York City.


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Artexpo14-1
1.  Artexpo New York 2014. The entry hall.

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Artexpo14-2 2.  Artexpo New York 2014. The major hall.

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Artexpo14-3 3. Artexpo New York 2014. The major hall.

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Artexpo14-44. Artexpo New York 2014. The major hall.

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Artexpo14-55. Artexpo New York 2014. The major hall.

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Artexpo14-66. Artexpo New York 2014. The major hall.

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Artexpo14-7 7.  Gallery pavilion. Progressive Fine Art, Ontario, Canada.

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Artexpo14-8 8. Gallery pavilion. Progressive Fine Art, Ontario, Canada.

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Artexpo14-99. Gallery pavilion. Progressive Fine Art, Ontario, Canada.

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Artexpo14-1010. Gallery pavilion.

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Artexpo14-1111. Gallery pavilion.

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Artexpo14-1212. Gallery pavilion. Square Gallery / Liquid Art System, Italy.

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Artexpo14-1313. Gallery pavilion. Square Gallery / Liquid Art System, Italy.

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Artexpo14-1414. Gallery pavilion. Square Gallery / Liquid Art System, Italy.

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Artexpo14-1515. Gallery pavilion. Nick Paciorek Fine Art, Providence, USA.

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Artexpo14-1716. Gallery pavilion. Nick Paciorek Fine Art, Providence, USA.

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Artexpo14-1617. Gallery pavilion. AVA Gallereia, Helsinki, Finland.

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Artexpo14-1818. Gallery pavilion. Exhibition.

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Artexpo14-1919. Gallery pavilion. Art discussion.

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Artexpo14-2020. Gallery pavilion. Exhibition.

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Artexpo14-2121. Gallery pavilion. Exhibition.

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Artexpo14-2222. Gallery pavilion. Mecenavie Gallery, Paris, France.

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Artexpo14-2323.  Gallery pavilion. Tatyana International Art, Houston, USA.

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Artexpo14-2424.  Gallery pavilion. Sammoun Fine Art, Brossard, Canada.

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Artexpo14-24525.  Gallery pavilion.

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Artexpo14-2626. Gallery pavilion.

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Artexpo14-2727. Gallery pavilion. Smart Publishing, Florida, USA.

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Artexpo14-2828. Solo pavilion. D.Kaligos, Virginia, USA.

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Artexpo14-2929. Solo pavilion. Robert Hartshorn, Ohio, USA.

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Artexpo14-3030. Solo pavilion. Beijing China Painting & Calligraphy Collector Ass., Beijing, China.

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Artexpo14-3131. Solo pavilion. Aleksandr Fayvisovich, New York, USA.

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Artexpo14-3232. Solo pavilion. Larisa Psaryova, Moscow, Russia.

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33. Artexpo New York 2014.

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34. Artexpo New York 2014.

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Evening in Paris.

Evening is the most important part of day in Paris and without a doubt, the most beautiful part of it. It is difficult to spend the whole evening at home in this city. Don’t even try…

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1.  The Louvre.

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2.  Saint-Germain of Auxerrois Church.

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3.  Notre Dame Cathedral.

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4.  The Latin Quarter. The Sorbonne.

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5.  The Boulevard Saint-Michel.

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6.  The Boulevard Saint-Germain.

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7.  Place Vendôme.

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8.  Rue de l’Échelle.

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9.  Avenue de l’Opera.

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10.  Hotel du Louvre.

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_DSC0618 11.  Place Colette.

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12.  Rue Saint-Honore.

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13.  …number five until midnight…

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14.  Rue Saint-Honore. A street cafe.

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15. The tea room of “Cafés Verlet”.

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16.  Rue Royale.

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17.  Rue Saint-Honore. The entrance gate of the Elysée Palace.

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18.  The entrance gate of the Elysée Palace seen from Rue de Miromesnil.

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19.  The Eiffel Tower at night.

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2014. Happy New Year!

Dear readers of the journal “Russian Art & Paris”, we thank you for your everyday presence, for your letters and your thoughtful comments. We sincerely wish you and your family success and happiness in 2014!

Happy New Year!

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“RUSSIAN ART & PARIS”. STATISTICAL TABLE OF VIEWS.

PA&P-STATS-1-2014

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Salon “Art en Capital” 2013, (Paris)

THE EXHIBITION OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2013

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Art en Capital was born in 2006 out of a desire by the “historic Salons of the Grand Palais” and by artists of differing approaches to focus on their differences, to join forces in order to create this unifying and innovative event. So for the last eight years, the Salon Comparaisons, Société des Artistes Français (Society of French Artists), Société des Artistes Indépendants (Society of Independent Artists) and the Salon du Dessin et de la peinture à l’eau (Drawing and Watercolour Salon) have come together under the glass roof of the Grand Palais. With over 40,000 visitors every year and up to 2,500 established or emerging artists exhibiting at the Grand Palais, Art en Capital has become part of the French and international art scene.

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The state of contemporary fine art is one of the most intriguing mysteries of the cultural landscape surrounding us. What happens within it? Is there logic and meaning in the chaotic variety of the quests of modern artists? Is it even possible to use the word quest in defining the desire to find ground beneath ones feet? All these questions, having arisen in the last decades, quite naturally come to mind in the huge hall of Grand Palais, at the exhibition of the Salon ’13.
•  The witty photo collage by Francois Chery on the theme of the painting “Rainy Day” by Gustave Caillebotte may well serve as a visual epigraph for the presented exposition. The meaning of this collage is obvious – Paris is Paris and the Parisians are Parisians, despite the change of surroundings. This is true, however our way of life changes, our thoughts and emotions change, and with them the painting language changes as well. The search for a new visual language that adequately reflects our time is a constant and unchanging task for an artist of any era, and such creativity is collective. In the case that this quest is successfully allowed, there may arise an artistic phenomenon, distinguishable as a style. This sequence – from language to style – cannot be disrupted. Style does not arise from individual creativity, even for a brilliant artist. First, a new language must arise. However, there is one caveat – “new language” does not mean “new alphabet.” Letters remain the same – A, B, and so on, until the last character – everything that can be called basic education.
•  In the exhibition at the Grand Palais, such technique is certainly present. Salon 2013 as a whole looks stronger and more interesting than last year’s exhibition. The many years of work by the jury, focused on screening weaker artworks, is beginning to bear quite tangible results – the exhibition has acquired features of a professionally oriented exposure with clear genre-based blocks of artworks. All this positively distinguished Salon 2013 from the tendentious chaos of the last FIAC. The negative sides are the common ones of contemporary fine art: insufficient high culture of working with color; weak compositional structure; misunderstanding of the difference between meaning and content.
•  The spectators – a passive, but an influential part of the art world, deserve special mention. There were many of them and there was no sense that this is an arbitrary audience. The concentration of viewers around the most interesting art pieces is a good indicator of artistic culture. Against this background, what seemed rather amusing was the lack of attention from the French press. Critics have for too long served as advertising agents and have apparently become accustomed to this function. And in fact, is it worth expressing ones opinion, if no one has made an advance payment for it? Nevertheless the art of painting, though it is not too fast, still returns under the arches of the Grand Palais. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

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1.  Grand Palais.

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2.  Exhibition hall.

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3.  The vernissage.

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4.  Exhibition hall. View from above.

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5. Inside the exhibition halls.

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6. The artistic town.

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7.  This is 224th salon. The historic section.

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8.  The historic section.

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9.  “Hommage a Gustave Caillebotte” by Francois Chery, (France)

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10. Viewers and artworks. “Efertiti”  by Tompep, (Spain)

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11.  “Le cerceau”.

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12.  “Homme”  by Milen, (France)

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13. “Thishbe au couvre-feu”  by Yoran Lucas, (France)

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14.  “Autoportrait”  by Patrick Rouquette, (France)

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15.  “Portrait de Gandhi”  by Martine Vaugel, (France)

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16. ” The Dream”  by Vladimir Shichkov, (Russia)

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17.  “Snowfall”  by Aleksandr Fayvisovich, (USA)

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18.  “La Venus en torsion”  by Robert Righino, (France)

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19.  Etchings by Vitaly Gubarev, (Russia)

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20.  Etchings by Leonid Stroganov, (Russia)

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21.  …

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22.  “Bonsoir, Vincent!”  by Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya, (Russia)

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23.  “The  blizzard”  by Evgeni Yali, (Russia)

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24.  ”Secrets of black snowflakes”  by Anastasia Vostrezova, (Russia)

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25.  “Napoleon”  by Stephane Santi, (France)

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26.  “Shichi”  by Toshikazu Minegishi, (Japon)

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27.  “Yomito 13”  by Yoshiaki Tsutsui, (Japan)

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28. Artist M. Horrie (left);  Artist S. Prischedko (right).

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29.  “Sommeil d’amour”  by Catherine Roch, (France)

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30.  “La pudeur”  by Ochakov, (France)

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31.  “La nuit saturienne”  by Laurent Navarre, (France)

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32.  “Gekka-Bijin”  by Tadamichi Tsuzuki, (Japon)

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33.  “Les Arums et 3 pommes”  by Yuichi Ono, (France)

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34.  “Fleurs et fruits”  by Sashiko Yoshida, (Japon)

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35.  …

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36.  “Cent paysages de Yokohama”  by Kenji Goukon, (Japon)

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37.  “Vauxhall Bridge road”  by Simon Lacoudre, (France)

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38.  Hall of the Grand Palais.

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39. The “Russian Art & Paris” Editor Ekaterina Semeniouk and artists Vitaly Gubarev, Aleksandr Fayvisovich, Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya meet with a Swiss impresario Ludmila Petrova (left).

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40. The Avenue des Champs-Élysées at night.

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Russian B-2French B-2

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