Artist Mikhail Kaban-Petrov, (Kosterevo)

THE “RUSSIAN ART & PARIS” INTRODUCING:   

M.K-P-por2-4I have never regretted becoming an artist and I’m not ashamed of my profession. However, I was never able to accept what I do for just a profession – it is really something else. I started like everyone else with a simple desire to learn to draw. I, like many, am familiar with the inexplicable excitement, arising from the sense of how fathomless art is. In the village where I was born and grew up, there was no art studio or art school, so I came to everything myself. I was euphoric from the smell of oil paints and the smell of rare art albums. Instead of cubes and pyramids I drew and painted as best as I could all that surrounded me – portraits of family, household utensils, rooks and our river. I never thought about professionalism as a criterion for evaluation. Professionalism – is good … and I agree that it is better with than without it, but in his own depths an artist should remain an amateur, without this his professionalism is dead
•  It so happened that in my “training” life there were no “teachers”. That is, those who would directly teach you to see and think. There were favorite artists, which I gradually revealed and studied from. In my early years I was truly mesmerized by Mikhail Vrubel and later Viktor Popkov. If we talk about tastes and influences, it is necessary to talk about art in general. The first film by Tarkovsky’s that I watched was “Solaris”. I can find no words to describe it other than shock. I did not know anything about the director, and not much about the film, but I still remember the state I was in – the state of surprise when everything in me was turned upside down. A similar reaction happened from contact with Brodsky’s poetry, literally from the first poem. List of “spiritual brothers” can be very long, but lets come back to Andrei Tarkovsky. Specifically him, I can call my “teacher”, because the impact of his work was more than substantial and greatly influenced
my thinking.
•  I can not say that I consider myself to be a fully established artist. I am more concerned about myself tomorrow – rather than myself today or yesterday. I really love my job and can no longer imagine myself without creative work. I love the creative process itself. Especially the middle part of it, when you already pushed away from the initial concept and the work itself begins to make adjustments and lead you to the final version. That is, in the end you always get something a little bit different, a little bit more. Therefore, I treat creative work like a miracle. In that which I paint or am about to paint, I first of all see a phenomena. Phenomenon-Bread, Phenomenon-Boat, Phenomenon-Air, Phenomenon-wind and so on. In general, it is always difficult for an artist, and there is no point in explaining your work. Art, like music, acts on the subconscious almost instantly – enjoy it or not, touches or not …

Mikhail Kaban-Petrov for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

.

*  *  *

M.K-P-por3

.

In painting “everything is on the degree
of disappearance of reality and the return to it.”

Yuri Norshtein

 

The nature of the art language of painting is non-verbal, if a picture can be described in words, it’s a bad picture. Describing the artwork of artist Mikhail Kaban-Petrov just does not make sense. Being extremely concise by form, they involve the viewer in an unrestrained flow of associations, allusions, metaphors, and intersections with other worlds of the arts. The author understands his work as realism, the objective world is an unshakable plot-thematic pillar of his works. However, the moving motive of his artwork is not an image, but an expression of deep, multifaceted, ambiguous, performed contradictions of human experiences.
•  The inevitability of conflict between matter and spirit conveys an intense drama with a visible absence of action. In the works of Mikhail Kaban-Petrov there is created a space of experiences, the artwork of feelings and even passions. A dry leaf, an apple, a boat, a road is present 'Heat'as an object of an image and reflection. The foundation of the paintings’ plot is the arrival of objects in space and time. Time may flow differently in the artworks. Series of works “Solid” (2011) – about the asphalt under the wheels of a moving car. Still life “Heat” (2011) viscous long midday slumber. Still life, “The Glove” (2011) on how stepping over a puddle, you notice that someone dropped it.
 The artist bravely operates with space, sometimes shrinking it to the size of a canvas, sometimes expanding a microcosm to the same size. The space-time continuum is constructed in a cycle of artworks. Cycles “Boards” (2011), “Russian theme” (2011) touch upon the acute problems of the modern world-view, the experiences of changes to the world picture, coupled with inevitable losses and the inescapable desire to avoid them. Both cycles are combined by a cross-cutting theme – the image of apples on the table, and a distinctive color and compositional “rhyming”, a continuous rhythmic organization of the picture’s planes.
•  In the 1970’s, visual arts came in close contact with cinematograpy. Cinema at this time acquires its artist, who begins to build each frame and their film series under the laws of easel artwork, making them the subject of contemplation. For a long time painting was in a search of ways to transfer motion and other intrinsic techniques of action. However visual arts have one decisive advantage – it commands silence. Remember – “the greater a pause – the greater an actor.” Artwork is a pause in time and space. Artist Mikhail Kaban-Petrov is mastering this amazingly effective technique, he holds the pause, giving the viewer a chance in the silence of art to realize something important and forever existent.

by Irina Marsheva, art critic,
member of the Union of Artists of the Russian Federation.

____

Pictures in the text:
“Heat”  Oil on canvas,  (110 x 120 cm)

.

.

'Русская-тема'-(Молитва)-2“Russian theme” (Prayer)  Oil on Canvas. (133 x 90 cm)

.

The complexity of the assessments and the perceptions of contemporary art are in many ways linked to the orientation of the audience and the critics towards the generally accepted canons and artistic trends. The grading scale is thus attached to the present from the past. Roughly speaking, the definition of “what should be,” is willingly or unwillingly built on the assumption of “what was”. It would be interesting to ask art critics about how they see the future of fine art? And is it possible to also get an assessment of modern art based on the criteria of the future, not the past? The very question seems rhetorical at first glance – the example of empty cells in the periodic table is probably known to everyone. What is getting in the way? Perhaps there is a well-established view of art in society as one of the varieties of the service sector, which implies adherence to the aesthetics of today. This is not true. Fine art does not engage in the servicing of aesthetic needs. Its purpose and scope are in a completely different field. As an illustration, let’s take a look at the work of one of the modern masters.
•  In the upside down world of the painter Mikhail Kaban-Petrov, everything is very similar to the truth. The inverted boat that will not float because of winter (“Boat”). And will the thawing ever come, and with it the pure water on which you can float, no one knows. Perhaps the thawing will never occur and the boat will not float ever. Is that not true? A door, remarkable in that it is closed (“Door”). Light makes its way under the door – there is someone, there are people, there is life, there people are “… again, not sleeping. Maybe drinking wine, maybe sitting around.“ (M.Tsvetayeva). But we, the audience, and the artist himself, are on this side of the door. Will we be able to get to where theRekviemlight is? Maybe yes, maybe no. “Heat,” where there are two people noticeably present, although neither are in the plane of the image; and from the outside world there only remains a red-hot streak of light making its way out of a curtained window. There is no life, only the emptiness of heat. The life in here, in this room, and what we see, is but a fragment. A fragment reinterpreted in the artistic space of a canvas. What kind of artwork is this? What is its essence? First of all in this remarkable truth, is a feature invaluable to art – uniqueness, as the Parthenon is unique, despite the abundance of marble.
•  The artwork of M. Kaban-Petrov is far from symbolism, it contains no simple set of metaphors. The nature of this painting is deeply national – there is more Dionisy in these canvases than Cezanne. The style of paintings by M. Kaban-Petrov is associated with black and white “graphics” of the novels by Dostoevsky. “Requiem”, is made in a “negativity” form that is very unexpected for an artistic painting. “Prayer”, with a tragic red color and the no less tragic “The Wall”, show an inner spiritual relationship with the major themes of Dostoevsky.
•  The realism of the perception of the surrounding world, the understanding of the world as an objective reality, is materialized in the artistic reflections on the content and meaning of this reality. What we see in artworks of Mikhail Kaban-Petrov, is not just a glance from the side at our present reality, but a glance at it from a different time. A glimpse from the future. This is how our time will look, the part of it that went into the field of view of the artist, through the eyes of future generations of viewers (and joining them, art critics).  ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Pictures in the text:
“Requiem”   Oil on canvas,  (122 x 90 cm)

.

Дверь“Door”  Oil on Canvas. (135 x 90 cm)

.

Using the resources of abstract painting, the artist creates a series of artworks where the boundaries between the real and the abstract are erased. He says that the basis of all beauty – a form that is created by nature forever, but which has secret content, a hidden truth. It inherits the method of Russian thinking – the philosophy of life, the desire to know the truth, which gradually expands to the chasm of metaphysics.”

R. Savchenko, art critic.

.

Mikhail Kaban-Petrov was born in the village Reshety, Novosibirsk region, in 1966. He recieved his professional education in Novoaltaysk State Art College (1990) and the Moscow State Academic Art Institute named after Vasiliy Surikov, under the guidance of academician V. Sidorov (1996). Mikhail Kaban-Petrov is a member of the Professional Artists Union of Russia (2001). Since 1996 artist lives and works in Kosterevo.

.

Russian B-2French B-2Gallery B-2

 

.

.

.

.

.

 

Artist Alena Dergiliova, (Moscow)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2014

AD-Port-5-2I was born in a one-story merchant house at Taganka. The house stood on the corner of Vorontsov street which still had trams back then, and Mayakovsky alley. The end of that alley was once home of poet Vladimir Mayakovsky. My grandmother told me how she met him on the street many times, with a cane and hat, walking home with a flourish. Streets of cobblestone and asphalt came later. At the corner there is a column with artesian water, which are now found in the provinces and have disappeared from Moscow in the sixties. The courtyard is a classical Moscow type, surrounded by a dense, high fence with a gate still hanging on large hinges, and with gateways on both sides. Two huge, ancient trees, behind whose trunks playing children would hide, are still standing. This is the only thing that survives today from those times.

While walking through the old Moscow, my eyes unerringly catch pieces and corners that are not yet affected by the “restructuring”, carrying within them a century of history. Many of my watercolors of Moscow houses are “portraits”, for example: “Sivtsev Vrazhek, 6″, “Crickets Lane”, “Yauza Boulevard.” What is important to me are the details that help to accurately convey what is planned. The watercolor “On the street Solyanka” is a portrait of a piece of an old fence, worldly-wise and living its last few years. Now there are irreversible changes in our environment, that are probably necessary. It is very painful, like the passing of loved ones.

Alena Dergiliova for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

.

.

*   *   *

AD-Port-6-2Alena Dergiliova is one of the most prominent Russian graphic artists, that are acutely aware of the “aura” of objects, their primary energy. It catches the eye of viewers, who observe the artwork for long periods of time, filled with hidden power. Outwardly, they are harmonious, but include a lot of dissonance that creates worry. In Soviet times, Dergiliova was breaking free from the strict ranks of “Varnishers” with the reality of being “disheveled” and lack of heroism in her scenes. In the format of what is called “new” art in modern Russia, she is not radical enough, does not wander around the labyrinth of the subconscious and does not create art for the decoration of walls.
A significant virtue of the artwork is the objectivity of life in the perception of reality. Personally heartfelt and hard-won artistic senses are formulated into a complete image. These features can be very beautiful or not very pleasant, but they are quite familiar
Moscow was portrayed by many famous Russian artists. Every age gives rise to new art creators. We know the graphic art of A. Vasnetsov dedicated to recreating the ancient landscape of the city. We remember the Усадьба-Аксакова-на-Сивцевом-Вражке-(28б5х21)2004--(1)canvases of Y. Pimenov, filled with the joy of sensations of the advent of new residential areas, watercolors of V. Alfeevskiy and K. Kupecio. The beauty of the architecture of Moscow is still today trying to be captured by many graphic artists and painters. However, the changes in Moscow in real time are so significant, that they require the deepest possible understanding of what is happening, by means of art. The complexity and tenderness of these changes can only be felt by an artist, not just living in Moscow and worrying about her fate, but also drawing daily the constantly changing face of the beloved city.
Such an artist, with heart tied to Moscow, is Alena Dergiliova. A series of watercolors “My Moscow”, created over the last fifteen years, is the most striking and significant phenomenon in her work. The series consists of 100 watercolors that reflect life in historic districts as well as the characteristic features of modern urban ensembles. Four Sverchkov.perscenic blocks: “Metropolitan life”, “Old streets”, “Gentry Moscow”, “Stalin’s Moscow” allow the viewer to fully immerse himself in the multi-level world of this city. A distinctive feature of the series is the construction of compositions in the form of a pictorial space in which people, houses, streets and squares of the capital all act as equal characters, creating a feeling of a “live” city.
• The watercolors of Dergiliova differ from the scenic and graphic works of other contemporary authors representing Moscow and other capitals of the world, by their complex scenic intertwining. The deliberate and professional use of symbolism of the mundane gives the watercolors credibility and depth. The image-symbol may have the widest meaning and leads viewers to the essence of phenomena by forms of expression that externally are not heroic. The artworks of Alena Dergiliova are not cityscapes with staffage but rather intricately lined paintings with action, unfolding in a particular historical or contemporary urban environment. In order to understand her work it is necessary to move away from internal complacency, and only then will the external ordinariness of the presented action be revealed in the form of a controversial and not always comfortable life.

by Nikolay Beschastnov, Ph.D. in Art History
Director of the Art Institute of Moscow State University of Design and Technology

____

Pictures in the text (from above):
“Palace of Aksakov” Etching. (28 x 21 cm); “Sverchkov Pereulok” Watercolor. (70 x 52 cm).

.

.

Подсосенский переулок“Podsosenskiy Pereulok”  Watercolor. (78 x 58 cm)

.

.

*   *   *
The graphic art of Alena Dergiliova is difficult to define in a few words. The phrase “lyrical grotesque” will probably sound strange and unusual, especially in relation to an graphic-artist working in the classical techniques of etching and watercolor. The point, apparently, is not in the accuracy of the formal wording. Value is contained foremost in the quality of the art form, in which the thoughts and feelings of the artist are served. Expectations for etching are traditionally very high. This kind of graphic art is best not approached without a virtuoso technique – an amateur can be discerned at a glance. Yet technical skills alone do not turn a sheet of paper passed through the etching press into an etching. A genuine charm, a unique aura of etching occurs only if there appears a scene that is not depleted, but rather enriched, by the black-and-white image. It is hard to say which has greater meaning – the ability of the artist to see an etching motif in the world around him, or a particular feel for the etching board on which the essential details required for etching will be revived. In addition, a black-and- white image has a unique feature – it is concentrated on only the main idea, only the essence of the depicted scene. No dispersion or verbosity, one who is not able to separate the essential from the secondary – will never create a real etching.
•  “Apple tree” is an etching by Alena Dergiliova, that is one of the most classical in form. The plot appears as a conflict between two harmonious forms, united into a single space. There are live forms, created by nature, such as tree branches and яблонька,1992artificial forms, created by man, like the Cathedral bell tower. Compositionally this conflict is developed through black color – the movement of large masses of black (Cathedral bell tower) and the tremulous, translucent graphics of black branches. The compositional conciseness drastically enhances the natural qualities of black and white, its inner nature – topicality, the focus on sincerity, and the accuracy – at least from the author, at most from the event. There appears an effect, present here and now, equivalent to the philosophical category – “grasp”. Thus, the artistic decision – the selection of the moment filled with meaning, creates a sense of belonging in the event. There arises a contact of the artwork with the viewer, and their dialogue begins. The importance of this dialogue is determined in equal amounts by both participants. The energy of the artistic image, its aesthetic and intellectual depth, determine the quality of the artist’s work. The reading of an artistic image, its description – is the work that must be done by the viewer. The small etching “Apple tree” is the quiet sadness of autumn, fallen leaves, old Cathedral walls; it is the fate of generations who have touched these walls, it is the finiteness of life in the infinity of existence.
•  The stylistics of graphics by Alena Dergiliova are sincere, almost intimate – derived from the soft, “spoken” rhythm of most compositions. An artist leads his creative narrative to the rhythm of a home conversation – without raising his voice, avoiding sharp accents. A particular role in this is played by the knowledge of that which is the subject of the image. When a person believes in his own truth, he is not inclined to get short-tempered, even in a dispute. To learn and to understand that which you are depicting is a necessary condition for an image to have meaning. A slow movement from form to meaning is starting to appear in the art of our time. It is a difficult movement. Modern audiences are unaccustomed to meaning. The problem is that the absence of meaning leads to a degradation of feelings. The acquaintance with the art of Moscow artist Alena Dergiliova, artwork filled with feelings and meaning is a good reason to think about it. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Picture in the text:  “Apple tree” Etching. (21 x 15 cm)

.

.

AD-2“Palace of Denis Davydov”  Etching. (37 x 30 cm)

.

“The graphic art of Alena Dergiliova can certainly be called traditional: etching and watercolor by technique; urban landscape and portrait by genre; and finally, it is traditional by her artistic language, by the honest natural image without the aftertaste of styling, by the concreteness in the transmission of visual impressions. The artist does not hide the avid interest towards that which she represents, to the motive or character, whether it is a living person or a house in any of Moscow’s alleys (which is also lively in it’s own way, spirited and eccentric). This entire house, or more often only a small fragment, some quaint bay window, a massive staircase, an arch above the yard, windows in Sverchkov Lane – all this has some particular feature, everything is familiar, recognizable and often loved. Most often it is that quiet Moscow, where not every house is “a monument of architecture” of some old century. However every house is a surviving page of city life, of its intimate stories. Every house is the keeper of the memory of city and family life”.

Yuriy Gerchuk, 
Honored Artist of the Russian Federation, art critic.

.

Alena Dergiliova was born (1952) and raised in Moscow, in the artists’ family. Graduated from Moscow Textile University in 1975. The artist trained at the creative academic studios of the USSR Academy of Arts, under the guidance of academician Orest Verejskiy. Alena Dergiliova is a member of the Artists’ Union of Russia since 1983. Artist received the Medal of the Russian Academy of Arts in 2007. The works of Alena Dergiliova – etching and watercolor are in the collections of museums: The State Tretyakov Gallery (Moscow), The State Historical Museum, The Museum of History of Moscow, The Leo Tolstoy’s museum.

.

.

EXHIBITIONS

Dergileva-LogoEtchings by Alena Dergiliova in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2014, (Paris).

.

.

Russian B-2French B-2Gallery B-2
.

.

.

.

Paris as usual.

Paris’ grandeur is inspiring but what I love most about the city is its intimacy. Its quartiers (quarters) are like a patchwork of villages, and while it’s one of the world’s major metropolises – with all of the culture and facilities that go with it – there’s a real sense of community at the local shops, markets and cafes that hasn’t changed since my childhood. Yet because every little ‘village’ has its own evolving character I’m constantly discovering and rediscovering hidden corners of the city.

By Catherine Le Nevez

.
.

Paris-as-usual-11. Paris. An early morning.

.

Paris-as-usual-22. Street restaurants are already open.

.

Paris-as-usual-33. A morning at the Place de l’Étoile.

.

Paris-as-usual-44. Rue de Presbourg.

.

Paris-as-usual-55. The Arch of Triumph.

.

Paris-as-usual-66. A morning at the Champs-Élysées.

.

Paris-as-usual-77. The Latin Quarter. Rue Saint-Julien le Pauvre. Shakespeare & Company bookstore is around the corner.

.

Paris-as-usual-88. Shakespeare & Company bookstore. The first was opened by Sylvia Beach in 1919. During the 1920s, it was a gathering place for writers: Ezra Pound, Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce.

.

Paris-as-usual-99. Place Saint-André des Arts.

.

Paris-as-usual-1010. Labyrinthes of the Latin Quarter.

.

Paris-as-usual-34-211. Rue de Seine.

.

Paris-as-usual-1112. Labyrinthes of the Latin Quarter. Let’s go inside.

.

Paris-as-usual-1213. Cafe de la Turelle.

.

Paris-as-usual-3514. Rue Hautefeuille.

.

Paris-as-usual-1315. The Café Procope is called the oldest restaurant of Paris in continuous operation. It was opened in 1686 by the Sicilian chef Francesco Procopio dei Coltelli.

.

Paris-as-usual-1416. Relais Odeon is a classic French brasserie with Art Nouveau details. Founded in 1900.

.

Paris-as-usual-1517. Rue des Prêtres Saint-Séverin.

.

Paris-as-usual-1618. The Church of Saint-Séverin. It is one of the oldest churches that remains standing on the Left Bank, and it continues in use as a place of worship.

.

Paris-as-usual-17-219. The Church of Saint-Séverin. Interior.

.

Paris-as-usual-1820. The Church of Saint-Séverin. The organ is signed Jean Ferrand.

.

Paris-as-usual-1921. The old Paris. Rue de Nevers.

.

Paris-as-usual-2022. Rue de la Bûcherie.

.

Paris-as-usual-2123. Rue Jean de Beauvais at Boulevard Saint-Germain.

.

Paris-as-usual-2224. Rue Saint-Denis.

.

Paris-as-usual-2325. The church Saint-Leu-Saint-Gilles, located in the heart of Paris, dates back to the 13th Century (1230). It is one of the few religious monuments left from that period, standing along the old Roman road – Rue Saint-Denis.

.

Paris-as-usual-2426. The Church of St Eustace. The present building was built between 1532 and 1632. St Eustace’s is considered a masterpiece of late Gothic architecture. Molière was married here in the 17th century.

.

Paris-as-usual-2527. Rue Montorgueil.

.

Paris-as-usual-2628. Rue Étienne Marcel.

.

Paris-as-usual-2729. Rue Tiquetonne.

.

Paris-as-usual-2830. Fresh fish, …

.

Paris-as-usual-2931. …fresh fruit, …

.

Paris-as-usual-3032. … fresh flowers, …

.

Paris-as-usual-3133. … and fresh melody, of course!

.

Paris-as-usual-3234. A late afternoon is just a small pause before the most important part of day – a Paris’ night,

.

Paris-as-usual-3335. … but this is a different story.

.

.

.

.

2015. Happy New Year!

Dear readers of the journal “Russian Art & Paris”, we sincerely thank you for your everyday presence, for your letters and your comments. They are very important to us. We hope to maintain your attention in the new year as well. Best wished to you and your family in 2015! 

Happy New Year!

*  *  *

“RUSSIAN ART & PARIS”. STATISTICAL TABLE OF VIEWS.

PA&P-STATS-1-2015-2

.

.

.

.

Salon “Art en Capital” 2014, (Paris)

THE EXHIBITION OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2014

Salon14-1In the 9th showing, Art en Capital combines four historical exhibitions dedicated to the fine arts under the glass roof the Grand Palais: the Salon Comparaisons, Société des Artistes Français (the Union of French Artists), Société des Artistes Indépendants (Society of Independent Artists) and the Salon du Dessin et de la peinture à l’eau (Drawing and Watercolour Salon); these exhibitions have remained true to their artistic line of freedom, independence, and openness to all forms of expression and culture. This respect for tradition gives a broad panorama of contemporary art, and is a great showcase for the artists represented at the show, both known and new, French or foreigners in this beautiful Grand Palais, in the beating heart of the capital. The audience meets every year for this event. I am confident that this new exhibition will be held with the same success.

Fleur Pellerin,
Minister of Culture and Communication of France

.

This year, the Union of Artists of France introduced the 225 edition of their Salon. These many years shows the relevance and vitality of our union. This year, our exhibition showcases about 700 contemporary artists selected by a jury in the categories of painting, sculpture, graphics, architecture and photography. Different tendencies, different nationalities, freelance artists, open-minded and talented will present their work in this edition of 225. Our past is noted by the names of the most prestigious artists and it gives us the necessary stable foundation to go into the future. Spurious oscillations of the “art market” should not diminish the strength that we represent on a real art stage. Our presence in the Grand Palais from year to year is the best proof of this, for artists, for visitors and for professionals of the art world. At the beginning of the exhibition, we give tribute to the artists of World War I, years 1914-18. During these 4 years our society had lost 120 artists. The Union of Artists of France presides in 2014 over this show. This event must pass comparably to our hopes, enthusiasm, energy and talent, which the artists of our union invested in the success of this exhibition, Art en Capital 2014.

Martine Delaleuf,
President of the Union of Artists of France

,

In 2014, Art en Capital opens at Grand Palais for the ninth consecutive year. The exhibition collects about 2,500 artists in all areas. As always with great enthusiasm we take this exhibition, which lasts five days, in the Grand Palais, an architectural gem with a unique and multifaceted world. Like an echo of history in the same place, where for a long time art galleries were held in the 19th century, Art en Capital follows the traditions. In the same manner it is important for the Grand Palais to create different exposures, it is a monument on the stage of world art, as a home for creative people. Through such activities the Grand Palais familiarizes many people with contemporary art. This building also gladly accepts all those who epitomize the dynamism and vitality of the arts in France. Forty thousand visitors come, to discover all this and to support the artists of the exhibition. Art en Capital – the cultural event of the autumn which is impossible to just pass by.

Jean-Paul Cluzel,
President of the Reunin of National Museums – Grand Palais

.

*  *  *

Salon14-14-21. The Salon-2014 opens its doors.

.

Salon14-52. The exhibition hall.

.

Salon14-43. The exhibition hall. View from above.

.

Salon14-64. View from above.

.

Salon14-75. The first viewers – 2014.

.

Salon14-96. The vernissage – a lot of people today!

.

Salon14-107. Not bad for a start…

.

Salon14-138. Inside the exhibition halls.

.

Salon14-119. Cafe inside Grand Palais is masterpiece itself.

.

Salon14-1210.  First discussions.

.

Salon14-1511. Viewers and artworks.

.

Salon14-1612. New-old Olympia…….it is really nice!

.

Salon14-1713. Viewers. The first impression from exhibition.

.

Salon14-2014. Painting “Attraction” by Givi Siproshvili received “Prix Reijinsha-2014″ award. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Shichkov-2-215. Painting “Nymph” by Vladimir Shichkov. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-1916. Painting “Night nude” by Alla Polkovnichenko received “Prix Elisabeth Gallia-2014″ award. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-2117. Sculptor Margot Pitra, (France).

.

Salon14-2218. Painting by Masahito Kuginuki, (Japan).

.

Salon14-2319. Painting by Milen, (France).

.

Salon14-2420. Painting by Takue Higuchi, (Japan).

.

Salon14-2521. Painting by Nadiejda Mouly, (France).   Sculptor Yvonne Clergerie, (France).

.

Salon14-2622. Painting “Narcissus” by Andrey Shustov. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-27-223. Painting “Yang Guifei” by Ksenia Lavrova. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

 

.

Salon14-2824. Painting “Angel in the crown of thorns” by Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-29-225. Painting “The morning coffee” by Aleksandr Fayvisovich. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-3026. Sculptor …

.

Salon14-3127. Painting by Marion Six, (France).

.

Salon14-3228. Painting by Chu Ren Wang, (China).

.

Salon14-3329. Painting by Alexandra Rouard, (France).

.

Salon14-3430. Painting by Padoneli, (France).

.

Salon14-3531. Sculptor Miodrag Scepanovic, (Montenegro).

.

Salon14-38

32. Painting by Mutsuro Kimura, (Japan).

.

Salon14-3733. Painting by Olivier Lavorel, (France).

.

Salon14-3934. Painting by Marie-Josiane Blachon, (France).

.

Salon14-40-235. Painting by Denis Rifflard, (France).

.

Salon14-4141. Sculptor Chanet, (France).

.

Salon14-4242. Painting by Eric De Luca, (France).

.

Salon14-4343. Painting by Shojiro Nakano, (Japan).

.

Salon14-4444. Painting by Masako Fukami, (Japan)

.

Salon14-36-245. Sculpture “Rain” by Andrey Volkov received “Prix Adagp-2014″ award. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-4546. Etchings by Mikhail Kocheshkov received BRONZE MEDAL 2014. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-4647. Etchings by Alena Dergiliova. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-4748. Etchings by Vitaly Gubarev. (Please look at our EXHIBITIONS section).

.

Salon14-4849. Grand Palais is a lovely home for every artist.

.

Salon14-4950. Artist Givi Siproshvili. A short interview to the “Russian Art & Paris” staff.

.

Salon14-5051. Artists Alena Filippova-Kargalskaya, Alena Dergiliova and Andrey Shustov are tea lovers. Looks good!

.

Salon14-5152. Artist Andrey Volkov explains the nuances of working with metal.

.

Salon14-5253. This is recollection of Sisyphus. It is probable a hint for artists life…

.

Salon14-5354. It was a nice day!

.

Salon14-54-255. Exit from Grand Palais.

.G.Palace56. A long queue to entrance is still in front of exhibition hall.

 

.

Salon14-5557. The late celebration in the “Russian Art & Paris” headquarter.

.

.

Russian B-2French B-2

.

.

.

.

.

Salon “Montreux Art Gallery” 2014, (Montreux)

 THE 10th SALON OF CONTEMPORARY ART “MONTREUX ART GALLERY” – 2014
.
MAG-2014
*  *  *
.
Ten years have passed with lightning speed. Light, dynamism, diversity, discovery, progress, are many of the words that come to mind when discussing the development of MAG, a contemporary art fair. Born from a combination of private initiative and the creative spirit of its founders, Montreux Art Gallery is widely recognized in the world of contemporary art as a high-level salon, which offers a wide range of artists and galleries nationally and internationally. In an effort to provide the public with an overview of trends in art, MAG has been establishing contacts with the world of art and culture for a long time. Painting, sculpture, graphic art are exhibited on 8000 square meters of exhibition space. The devotion of our visitors, as well as our members, have helped us to be certain each and every year that MAG should continue. This 2014 thus marks our first decade, and we are proud to introduce today a rich salon. To amaze you, to arouse your interest is our goal that we strive to achieve every year. We wish you a good visit, and we want to thank our partners who annually accompany us in this great adventure, our exhibition participants who bring us their creative abilities, and all those who participated in the development of Montreux Art Gallery-2014.
On the way to a new decade of art and culture in the heart of Montreux, Switzerland.
.
Jean-Francois Gaia,
Director MAG
.
.
This year Russia received the right to be the guest of honor of the 10th Salon of Contemporary Art in Montreux. I think this choice was not random. Switzerland has always attracted musicians, artists, and writers from Russia. Many of them found here both spiritual shelter and inspiration, creating some of their best works, included in the treasury of world culture. Tchaikovsky wrote in Switzerland the operas “Eugene Onegin” and “Joan of Arc”, Stravinsky created here one of his most famous works, “The Rite of Spring.” A concert hall in Montreux (Auditorium Strawinsky) was named in honor of this composer. Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy. Vladimir Nabokov have repeatedly visited and lived in Switzerland. Modern Russian culture, due to its openness and diversity, is still attractive for the Swiss. Participation in the Salon by Russian artists Zurab Tsereteli, Vitaly Gubarev, Anastasia Vostretsova and other masters will not only attract experts in the field of contemporary art and culture, but also all those who are interested in Russia, its culture and its history.
.
Opening remarks by Ambassador of Russia in Switzerland Aleksandr Golovin to the catalog of the 10th Salon of Modern Art in Montreux.
.

*  *  *

.

MAG-1-21. Montreux, Switzerland. MAG – 2014.

.

MAG-2-22. Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-33. Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-44. The vernissage.

.

MAG-55. Viewers and artworks.

.

MAG-86. Inside Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-67. Graphic arts by artist Zurab Tsereteli, President of the Russian Academy of Arts.

.

MAG-78. Paintings of artist Evgeni Yali (left) and artist Givi Siproshvili (right).

.

MAG-99. Artist Anastasia Vostrezova (left) in conversation with viewers.

.

MAG-1010. Artwork by sculptor Andrey Volkov.

.

MAG-1111. Paintings of artist Anastasia Vostrezova (left) and artist Aleksandr Pavlovets (right).

.

MAG-1212. Artist Givi Siproshvili in Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-18-213. Swiss impresario Ludmila Petrova, Curator of Russian Art section.

.

MAG-1314. Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-1415. Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-1516. Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-1617. Exhibition Hall.

.

MAG-1718. Exhibition Cafe.

.

MAG-1919. Montreux is first mentioned in 1215…

.

MAG-2020. …has a population of 26 000 and 45% of the population are resident foreign nationals.

.

MAG-2221.  Monument to Vladimir Nabokov in Montreux.

.

.

.Russian B-2French B-2
.

.

.

.

.

Artist Aleksandr Pavlovets, (Dnepropetrovsk)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “d’ART CONTEMPOREIN” MONTREUX 2014

AP Port-2Once, as a child my father took me to an art exhibition. Unlike reproductions, these paintings were alive – there were visible layers of paint and they attracted me to them so much that I wanted to touch the painting with my hands. I really wanted to draw at least one such real painting. I began to study painting, and over the years realized that there are a lot of good paintings; in order to not get lost in such diversity, it is necessary to have not only my own handwriting, but also my own worldview. The work of an artist is to constantly learn, to search and experiment. A true artist should be recognized even without his signature on a canvas; with regard to painting, it needs to bring joy to the audience and evoke a bright emotions. One would agree that there is more than enough grayness and dullness in this world…

Aleksandr Pavlovets for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

.

.

*   *   *

AP-Port-3
It is not difficult to imagine the poetics of a moment, when Ms. Struyskaya stared with a vague and mysterious glance from the insightful portrait of artist Fedor Rokotov of the 18th century, upon an equally discerning poet of the 20th century, Nikolai Zabolotsky. Fascinated by the image of Struyskaya, Zabolotsky wrote a poetic masterpiece “Portrait”, in which “out of the darkness of the past …” not just a beautiful Russian court woman, but all the beautiful women of the world embodied in painting appeared before the poet.
•  Perhaps this feminine – artistic! – charm of the “darkness of the past” pushed Aleksandr Pavlovets to the interpretation of well-known female images and the creation of a series of elegant paraphrases, starting with the sculptural portrait Nefertiti to “The Swan Princess” of Vrubel. The elegance of his works are sometimes disturbing, even frightening; and sometimes playful, flirtatious. At the same time it is perceived as a reliable aesthetic bridge thrown between the past and the present, leading to the worship of the divine beauty of Women and Painting.
•  The organization of art-pictorial space almost certainly contains an element of mysterious theatricality. Being fluent in the art of composition, having almost “perfect pitch” to the tonal nuances of color, the artist multiplied the possibilities of his talent. As a result – the solid correctness of creative interpretations and borrowing, intended to convince the audience of the need for a grateful modern look upon the classics, and perhaps to intensify the interest of a contemporary viewer to the values ​​of the past.
• Seduced by the female images of the great masters of the past, artist Aleksandr Pavlovets looks with caution and even a certain aloofness at the contemporaries portrayed by him. For the artist they are just charming, seductive models from which to pull away, creating images of “familiar strangers”; beyond them there is only “darkness of modernity”, which may be void, where the present has no potency to become IMG_88796-1meaningful “onetime”… The artist manages to play along with nature, gently flattering her and simultaneously sadly grinning. Alas, the master does not find the proper depth in the women portrayed, recognizing that “his own Struyskuyu” has not been created yet.
•  Habitually we associate woman with a flower, but in his “painting of bouquets” Pavlovets comes from the opposite: his beautiful flowers evoke sincere, almost erotic excitement, because the artist admires them no less than the images of women in classical painting, and creates them with the predilection of a painter-lover. Chardin’s thoroughness emanates from the bouquet of lilac, impressionistic vibrations come from the still life with small carnations, Rembrandt’s golden glow of autumn radiates his white chrysanthemums. Collected in a series, these paintings are fragrant with an extravaganza of color and provoke the viewer to remember the variety of exciting aromas.
•  “Peasant” still life are painted by the artist without a hint of force against nature: with a relaxed and joyful love. Tense and strictly balanced chiaroscuro contrasts, and color Still life with a bottleharmonies force us to remember the dignity of still life paintings by de Zurbarán and Chardin. The fruits of the earth in Pavlovian’s artworks are weighty and life-affirming – like in the paintings of Flanders in the 17th century. However, in his still lifes – the fruits of the rich and disturbing earth, are the fruits of Ukraine.
•  To the sophisticated traveler, Ukrainian city landscape motifs seem sad and not always attractive. The painter Aleksandr Pavlovets can poeticize the heavy with spring moisture, unfussy, stooping in the wind, patio of Dnepropetrovsk. He can breathe a pulse into the classically boring prospect of an autumn street with a cathedral steaming in the fog, with a shimmering gilded dome. He can convince the viewer in the Baroque freshness of a pseudo-baroque motif of the historic part of the city. Finally, he can evoke from the viewer a sense of nostalgia, born by the natural pull of a citizen to the aesthetics of not only the parade architecture, but also the shaded courtyard provincial architecture.
•  And always, in every motif, there is a search for a silent narrative of the walls about something precious that connects the human with the frightening and at the same time attractive urban environment.
•  Not burdened by moralization, the artwork of Aleksandr Pavlovets returns us to a righteous realism, a majestic effect which still expands upon us the art classics. The realistic artworks of our contemporaries, like the of works of Aleksandr Pavlovets indicate that the possibilities of realism are far from exhausted. In art, the realistic creation of the world of images and the reflection of the “world” of feelings are the spiritual and aesthetic future of mankind.

by Vitaly Starchenko,
Winner of the literary awards of Ivan Sokulsky and Pavlo Tychinaart critic.

____

Pictures in the text (from above):
“Still life with candlestick”  Oil on canvas. (50 x 70 cm); “Still life with a bottle”  Oil on canvas. (55 x 70 cm).

.

.

Joker 1

“Joker” Oil on Canvas. (90 x 80 cm)

.

*   *   *

To give a definition of artistic taste is not easy. It’s not so much for the lack of a tuning fork as in their abundance. Every single historical epoch had its tuning fork, and sometimes more than one. Our time is not an exception – there are plenty of tuning forks, and the loudest one is not necessarily the most accurate. The tuning fork of the artistic taste of contemporary painter Aleksandr Pavlovets sounds restrained, sometimes very quiet, but it is worth listening to. In the soft music of his works, there are very many precise notes.
• In delineating the space of the artistic images of Aleksandr Pavlovets, in finding a designation for this space, the simple word “harmony” seems natural, but not sufficient. An aura of tranquility in still life is replaced by an aura of tense silence in the portraits of women. An aura of coloristic hues interweaves with an aura of light and shadow. Compositional structures are distinct and laconic. The motions of live characters are almost always completed. The openness of female images is deceptive, their lips are tightly sealed. Harmony of rest? The harmony of silence? Yes, probably, but still something more.
•  How can the mystery of Danae capture the contemporary artist, a mature man of the twenty-first century? The charm of an ancient myth? But it has been retold a thousand times and implemented in hundreds of paintings. Interest in ancient Greek history? But the painting “Danae” by Aleksandr Pavlovets is devoid of any historical attributes, his Danae is timeless. Perhaps most importantly, it is the presence of the mystery itself, a mystery of the divine in the earth. The compositional decision of the artist is temperamental and sudden, the main character of the painting is made to be not Danae, but Zeus. No, it’s not just about the shimmering of verticals and gold color scheme (Zeus came to Danae in the form of a shower of gold). We look upon Danae through the eyes of Zeus, on canvas is his emotional order, his invisible presence. He is located at the point from which the viewer sees Danae. The sharply-modern interpretation of the plot is psychologically daring, and no less daring is the painting itself, almost fresco-like by its nature. The composition arranges the image, and the image revealing the meaning. Impeccable graphic slendernessAutumn 2of a sophisticated foreshortening of the female figure, is the only classical element of this artwork. Everything else is art of our time.
•  The painting of Aleksandr Pavlovets is a complex and unhurried artistic search within a relatively small aesthetic field. At the same time, the problems disclosed in such search are exceptionally relevant. As an example – the light and shadow is a base of construction of still-life by this artist, but simultaneously, his a decisive rejection of light and shadow in the figurative compositions leaves an open question – why? It is obvious that the basis of this difference is the different nature of the material world and the spiritual world. However, is this difference sufficient to create two separate painting aesthetics in a single artistic space? To answer this question is not easy and it is almost impossible to answer theoretically. Of value is only answer received on the canvas. The significance of an answer to this and similar questions will be confirmed (or not confirmed) in the works of other artists. The mechanism of artistic search in the visual arts functions slowly, but it has been working without any serious glitches and errors for centuries and no other mechanism is available for artists today. The distance traversed by Aleksandr Pavlovets along this road is considerable and the result is dozens of excellent fine art works. All of those are before the eyes of viewers. However, the road remains the same, with questions which, besides the artist himself, no one can answer.  ©

by Russian Art & Paris

____

Pictures in the text (from above): “Autumn”  Oil on canvas. (60 x 75 cm)

.

.

Danae 1 “Danae” Oil on Canvas. (65 x 110 cm)

.

Aleksandr Pavlovets, a painter and graphic artist, was born in 1954 in Dnepropetrovsk (Ukraine). After graduating from the Art school he continued his education in State Dnepropetrovsk University (1980). Since 1994, he has participated in international art exhibitions and competitions. Aleksandr Pavlovets lives and works in Dnepropetrovsk.

.

.

Russian B-2French B-2Gallery B-2
.

.

.

.

.

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 92 other followers