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“Russian Art & Paris” Art Show. Summer’12

Introducing a new section – “Russian Art & Paris” Art Show – the journal presents artists whose distinguishing feature, in addition to talent and creative skill, is primarily a bright individuality. These artists have their own recognizable style, and their own unique vision. The work of these masters: the sculptor Zakir Ahmedov, the artists Ksenia Lavrova and Sergei Trubin is concentrated mainly within the boundaries of the figurative genre.  This genre demands from contemporary artist the highest level of artistic maturity. The artists whose works are presented in the Art Show section now, meet these high standards fully.

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SCULPTOR ZAKIR AHMEDOV,  (BAKU)

Among the variety of styles and trends crowding the space of contemporary sculpture, the real choice for a creative person is amazingly small. Otherwise one can incorporate oneself into the flow of popular trends that attracts the attention of the public today. This would of course happen with the inevitable loss of an artist’s own face. Or an artist can try to sing his own melody with the risk to remaining unheard. This choice has always been there for the artist, but in our time, a person who values his creative freedom has a few more chances to protect this freedom. Sculptor Zakir Akhmedov is one of those who has already made his choice, and it is the natural choice for an artist with a talent and vision, for an artist who has something to say.
•  Zakir Ahmedova’s figurative compositions, which are lyrical, chamber-like in form, with a touch of Art Nouveau, are attractive primarily with the preciseness of real-life observations. The study, the live sketch from nature, can be sensed and recognized in almost every work of the sculptor. To save the immediacy of the sketch, to pass on the first, brightest, and sharpest impression to the viewer, is the task that is effortlessly and naturally solved in many creative works of Zakir Ahmedova. The author’s own judgment is restrained, and in each story, the word is mainly owned by its heroes. In a wide range of compositional variations, a few major themes stand out. One of them, the theme of “man and woman,” is noticeable in several successful works. “Retro” and “Gothic“, pull towards the symbol-sign. “Moment” and “Love“, have an intense psychology of sensations. Charming, lyrical and startlingly authentic are the compositions which include household accessories (chair, balcony grill). The bronze composition “Stars“, one of the best in the works of this master, is a little monologue by the author about the meaning of life. Live to see a star at dawn, and for what else? ©

by Russian Art & Paris

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“Love”  Bronze / founding. (45 x 45 x 40 cm)

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“Retro”   Bronze / founding.  (60 x 35 x 15 cm)

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“Stars”  Bronze / founding.  (65 x 54 x 24 cm)

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ARTIST KSENIA LAVROVA,  (SAINT PETERSBURG)

Probably one of the most impressive St. Petersburg graphic artists today, Ksenia Lavrova is equally gifted with a bright talent and a vibrant personality. An artist’s own style, the unique artistic vision are the features which are so highly valued in the art-world throughout all times. In the art of graphics, which is sophisticated and elitist by its nature, these features become critical . If there is no personal style, there is no artist. In the presented graphic compositions from the series “Historic Identities”, the problem of style does not appear theoretical. What is before us: a poster, an illustration, or an graphic arts? Where is the birthplace of these graphics: in the tradition of Russian Art Nouveau, or in the synthetic omnivorousness of pop-art? With what language does this artist speak to us? Perhaps the last question is the most interesting.
•  It is easy to see that the compositional constructions of K. Lavrova include the texture of the material as a separate component of the image. The material world of objects, colliding with live characters, suddenly acquires the right to speak. In this metaphysical space, the justacorps ceases to be a detail of clothing and becomes an independent character of the narrative. Items enter a dialogue: with each other and with the main character of the artwork. The dialogue of objects is the basis of plot for many works of the artist Ksenia Lavrova. Marie Antoinette’s wig clearly mocks its mistress. Queen Boleyn’s cloak is only waiting for an excuse to challenge her right to the throne. The voices of the objects, like the voices of musical instruments, build the melody of the composition. This tune becomes its content.
•  The traditional graphics language – the language of the conditioned space and chamber color rows noticeably expands the range of its capabilities in the works of Ksenia Lavrova. The harmony of the two fundamental, and at the same time difficultly compatible, graphic elements of lines and ornament is remarkable. The ornamental arrangement of the image’s plane is thought out and organic. The elegance of the compositional decisions, seemingly simple and obvious, is captivating by the conciseness and expressiveness of the result. Does everything mentioned above allow us to speak about the innovative nature of this artist’s work? Is it possible, within the framework of this artistic style, to create a painting with any, including any modern, theme. In other words, is this style sufficiently universal to be called a style? We will definitely search for the answer to this question in every new painting of the artist Ksenia Lavrova. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

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“Queen Anne Boleyn”   Acrylic on Paper. (41 x 55 cm)

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“Marie Antoinette”   Acrylic on Paper. (64 x 90 cm)

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“Henry VIII “   Acrylic on Paper. (41 x 55 cm)

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ARTIST SERGEI TRUBIN,  (ARHANGELSK)   

Etchings by Sergei Trubin are a complex phenomenon. The etching technique is rightly considered one of the most difficult in fine arts. For those who have remained alone with a small sheet of metal are familiar with that feeling of fear in front of its black primed surface. Etching does not tolerate amateurs. In order to achieve serious results with this technique, it is necessary to dedicate your entire life.
•  It is also complex because the central theme in the works of Sergei Trubin – erotica, requires from the author both an impeccable taste and an absolute individuality. An artist copying other people’s emotions is of no interest to anyone. To establish and reinforce an artist’s own creative style in a genre, which does not tolerate any hypocrisy or banality, is not easy, even for a sophisticated and experienced master. Sergei Trubin was able to achieve this objective.
•  The aesthetics of the erotic compositions by S. Trubin is not uniform. Complex, unexpected metaphors of etchings “The tour” and “Phases of the Moon”, with the spatial-tonal accents and well-developed details, are close to the traditions of classical engraving. The reverberating, almost poster-like aesthetics in sheets “Girlfriends” and “Girl with the goat”, look sharp and modern. The use of large masses of white is interesting and nontrivial, and in general, not typical for the engraving on metal. The composition “Echo” has a charming sophisticated romanticism;  the etching is amazing by its rhythmic tension, and by its exquisite tonal development of the dual-figured plot. The charm, lyricism, and clarity of style of this work make it possible to call this sheet a true work of art. Against the backdrop of senseless decorative tendencies that permeate contemporary graphics, the creative work of the artist Sergei Trubin is emotionally honest and open, having its own voice and its own intonation, will certainly find its own dedicated audience. ©

by Russian Art & Paris

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“Ehco”   Etching. (19 x 15 cm)

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“Moon phases”  Etching. (31 x 23 cm)

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“The tour” Etching. (23 x 17 cm)

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Artist Anastasia Vostrezova, (Saint Petersburg)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “ART CAPITAL” 2011 – 2015
THE SILVER MEDAL OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2012
THE BRONZE MEDAL OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2011
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I see painting as the art of depicting the world in its beauty, be it a person, landscape or flower. Everything has its own color, its own mood, its own soul. In the physical world, through the perfection of form, the divine manifests itself in beauty. Beauty reveals and depicts what is eternal. In my paintings, I try to follow this practice in an effort to ensure that in the hearts of viewers, the painting arouses a world of thoughts, emotions – happy or sad, but always poetic and sublime. Not always and not in every artwork can this result be achieved, but this is the main objective, without which painting becomes meaningless.

I spend a lot of time in the ballet theater, and in the auditorium, as well as backstage during performances and rehearsals. It is impossible not to love this magnificent scenic world. I often talk with the artists, musicians, people of ballet and I am very close to the words of the great Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova, addressed towards all ballet dancers and artists alike … and even towards all people: “Let’s dance more, and try to find more beauty in the dance as well as in life. A true artist – whether he dances or does something else – always strives for beauty. So let us become one with the world of true artists, just as we become one with the world of dancers, because by replacing ugliness with beauty in visual images and intangible areas, we come a little closer to happiness and completeness …”.
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Anastasia Vostrezova for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

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Against the backdrop of modern art, where there is no restriction of freedom of expression, we stop thinking that there is a downside to this permissiveness: the danger of losing the true balance between tradition and innovation, which are closely tied together. Today, the viewer who is more or less experienced in art, is difficult to hard to impress with catchy terminology of current trends. All of them can easily be heard or seen. The exhibition space is replete with all sorts of artistic “isms”, and each master armed with  the latest artistic arsenal creates
his picturesque worlds. Sophisticated and whimsical, they are of interest to very few people. These inventions lacks the most important thing – the presence of the artist, the person who has something valuable to say.
     The verified, genuine criteria of art is fully consistent with the creative style of Anastasia Vostrezova. A young artist who graduated from the St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts in 2008, she has already received good training in her native Yekaterinburg and managed to establish herself as a talented artist at many exhibitions.
     The painter’s unique and at the same time recognizable own painting style has its roots in the best examples of the world’s art heritage. Real parallels with the Russian native school of realistic painting of XIX century (we can remember iconic Vasily Polenov’s rural landscapes and bright, vivid beauty of women by Filipp Malyavin) appear in her art side by side with the influence of Mane and Degas. Yet, Anastasia preserves her individual and inimitable world vision, full of charming, magic, and soft poetry.
     The genre preferences of painter are also very diverse; from time to time she devotes her brush to landscape, portrait, still life and composed figurative scenes.The variety of technique follows the variety of topics. The oil painting, quite familiar to the audience nowadays, neighbor in her art with refined and gentle pastel technique, which was regarded through centuries as the most obvious confirmation of artistic skill. The plot, first of all capturing one’s attention in oil painting, here nearly vanishes; instead of it the sight is attracted by the grainy surface of the thick paper, agile strokes of the pastel pencil, slightly gleaming tones or, on the contrary, by the intense touch of pure color. Pastel is unsuitable for most complicated compositions and large-scale themes. Its own intimate nature determines the correct choice of the motifs themselves.
     Therefore the lyrical artistic intonation of Anastasia Vоstrezova’s works is accompanied by the specific circle of certain subjects – the flower pieces evoking the noble spirit of old Russian aristocratic household; bright folk types in the spicy oriental taste; and in particular the ballet themes, the world of theater and backstage. The tender and opaque vibration of pastel colors actualizes the delicacy and grace of young ballerinas, who seem to be charming not only on the stage but also in everyday life. The informal gesture of a girl refreshing her make-up, a little tired posture of a sitting girl are all marked with the natural inner beauty, which is even difficult to speak out. In the native school of painting this careful attitude towards the model can be found in the art pieces of Zinaida Serebryakova, who also turned to the ballet theme in 1920-th. But the older artist depicted it as the magnificent brilliant feast while Anastasia interprets the ballet much more modestly. Theater appears in front of attentive spectator’s eye as the essential (but not routine) part of life, which is able to uncover with every new sight other nuances and semitones of genuine beauty.

by Olga Pavlova, art critic,

aspirant of the Saint Petersburg State University
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“Sylphs”Pastel on Paper. (50 x 60 cm)
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The St. Petersburg Conservatory and company «Akiva Talmi Presents» (USA) are organizers of a new annual exhibition and competition, dedicated to the 150th anniversary of the N. A. Rimsky-Korsakov Saint Petersburg State Conservatory.
The project was presented in May 2011. Opening of the first exhibition contest was held in the foyer of the Opera and Ballet Theater of the St. Petersburg Conservatory. It was attended by more than 20 authors: students of the I.Repin St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts and the Shtiglitz Academy of Art & Design, already famous St. Petersburg artists, members of the Union of Artists of St. Petersburg, and members of the Union pastel society. At the opening of the exhibition came Dan Talmi, president of the American company «Akiva Talmi Presents». The jury was headed by People’s Artist of the USSR Oleg Vinogradov. In the first round of the contest, the winners were three authors: Inom Mansurov – theater and cinema artist, Elmira Mustafina – one of the most well-known watercolorists of St. Petersburg,  and young artist Anastasia Vostrezova – recent graduate of the I. Repin St. Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts.
The idea of the exhibition-contest “Ballet in the visual arts” is timed with the anniversary of the St. Petersburg Conservatory, which will be held in 2012. The French word «ballet» comes from the Italian word «balet-to» – dance. For the past three centuries, this word referred to the spectacle which combines music, dance, drama and visual arts. Ballet is a topic that has always inspired artists and sculptors, and the “Russian Ballet” is a special topic in the world of art. On April 29, 2012, the “World Day of Dance”, at the Opera and Ballet Theater in the St. Petersburg Conservatory, a ceremonial evening dance was held, at which the first part of the exhibition-competition “Ballet in the visual arts” was presented. The warm introduction was given by Oleg M. Vinogradov,  People’s Artist of the USSR and dean of the stage-director department. Diplomas and money awards were given to the participants of the exhibition-competition on May 31, 2012.

by Natalia Yablokova,
curator of the “Ballet in the visual arts”
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“Self-Portrait in a theater costume”Pastel on Paper. (60 x 50 cm)
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Anastasia Vostrezova was born in a family of artists in Ekaterinburg (1981). She spent all of her childhood in Moscow and in Pereslavl-Zalesski where her family had a summer house. She graduated from the I.Shadr Art College, Ekaterinburg (2000) and continued her art education in Saint Petersburg. In 2008 Anastasia Vostrezova graduated from the I. Repin Saint Petersburg Academy of Fine Arts, where she studied in the studio of Professor M. Devyatov. Now she live and work in Saint Petersburg.
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EXHIBITIONS

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Painting by Anastasia Vostrezova in the exhibition of the Salon “Art Capital” 2015, (Paris).

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Painting by Anastasia Vostrezova in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2013, (Paris).

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Painting by Anastasia Vostrezova in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2012, (Paris). The SILVER MEDAL 2012

.Painting by Anastasia Vostrezova in the exhibition of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2011, (Paris). The BRONZE MEDAL 2011

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Russian spelling: Художник Анастасия Вострецова, (Санкт-Петербург)
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Editorial: Three Months at a Glance.

Dear readers of the “Russian Art & Paris” journal!
Within the three months of existence of our publication, its virtual pages have been visited by art lovers from around the world. We welcome every one of you!
Your letters, which we receive every day, are also the subject of our constant attention. Some of your requests we fulfill immediately and with great pleasure, like when asked by Mr. Heimann from Vienna to: “Please put me on your mailing list now. Thank you, Peter Heimann – Vienna, Austria“. Dear Mr. Heimann, your name and e-mail address will henceforth and forever be in our mailing list as number one.
In most cases, your suggestions about our publication require much more serious thought. Please be patient. In any case, every single letter is read, you can be absolutely sure of that.
Today, we are especially grateful to our authors – art historians and critics, who along with us began creating this journal from a blank editorial desk. Their faces and biographies of creativity traditionally remain “behind the scenes”, but their presence in the art world is no less important than the presence of the artists themselves. Viewers need them both.
The journal has just begun, not all sections have been deployed and not all categories are open yet, but the main thing that we have today is you – our readers! Who you are and where you are from can be best described by the visit statistics, which we bring to your attention now.



Artist Andrey Shustov, (Naberezhnye Chelny)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “ART EN CAPITAL” 2012 – 2014
A thin, barely discernible line at first moving timidly across the canvas, adjusting and refining, then stretches, gaining full strength, filling up with color, clinging to the very edge of the stretcher, and finally, turns into the horizon. The horizon, which is linearly hard and clear, is one of the principal characters in my paintings. The horizon of the table, the horizon of the room, the horizon of the landscape, very low, very high, defines the boundaries of the characters’ actions, sometimes sparingly giving them limited areas of freedom, other times generously sending them into a space without boundaries.

The horizon, cutting through flat space, pretending to be the edge of the painted screen, behind which it is impossible to see, and which is unable to be moved. The obstinate horizon reserves the right to disappear from the canvas and descend into observing the movement of the painting’s color masses, forcing even the author himself to believe in its necessity and invincibility.

Andrey Shustov for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.
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In the modern era of polystylism in art, it is very difficult to not get lost and actually become a prominent figure with your own artistic world, one which is interesting for lovers of fine art. Learning from the experience of predecessors and mastering the grammar of a particular painting style does not guarantee success. This can only be the foundation. Pushing from it, building your own visual row, your own world of feelings, everyone has to go his own way, trusting intuition and striving hard for a self-sufficient sense of identity. Some painters follow the path of observation and reflecting upon the real world, and others through meditation and transformation of natural forms.
     An artist who seeks his own intonation in the synthesis of the concrete and the imagined, is Andrew Shustov. His search for a new visual language, is an exploration into the color possibilities of painting. This search relies on the French school of painting of the late 19th – early 20th centuries, and their followers on Russian soil. This is possibly where the artist’s interest towards still life come from. The plotless painting, like a fragment of the reflection of the real world, becoming more popular among artists at the beginning of the 20th century, opens great possibilities of interpreting nature. Moving the object as close as possible, focusing on its integrity and materiality, the artist puts it on the canvas close-up, separating it from the surrounding reality. The two-dimensional space of the canvas thus becomes a cluster of artistic matter, a kind of decorative element, consisting of the living rhythm of color patches (“Onion”, “Tea”).
     Landscape, once playing a minor role, has become a separate genre since the 17th century. Its rise came into the 19th century. At this time, it rose to the importance of an “eternal theme.” In modern art, its position remains unchanged. A huge variety of existing forms of the material world, movement, and internal connections of a single natural matrix are the creative impulse for the individual reading of the topic. In this traditional genre, many contemporary artists continue to work productively, including Andrew Shustov who prefers the urban landscape. The effect of his paintings are based mainly on the contrast between a few key local areas of color and additional harmonic color series. Such works are fragments of the real world, transformed by the author’s imagination into a planar-decorative composition, with a strong color intensity and dynamic rhythms, which has lots of sunlight. In the urban landscape, the architecture itself, with its geometric shapes having clear contours, suggests a corresponding decision – the organization of space within the composition in the style of stained glass art with a strong facet of colorful spots (“Last Year’s Sun”, “Bay”, “Girona”,  “Heat”).
     The art of Andrew Shustov is also attractive due to the fact that he is a color-minded artist. Every element of his paintings is not accidental, but occurs according to the logic of a special reflection of reality, both the present one, and the one that is born within him. Figurative paintings are the fruit of the painter’s imagination, of his artistic fantasies coupled with the clear presence of irony and a tendency for oxymoron (“Antediluvian Childhood”). The author’s confident tone captivates the viewer and easily leads to the world invented by the artist. This world is populated by touching, funny, naive and charming characters, in some ways similar to us, made specifically with simplified forms – bearded men, women, centaurs, creatures with wings, as well as birds and fish … The eccentric figures are static images, and their condition and mood is determined by the gesture, posture, the turning of the head (“Bathing in the hole”, “Rubicon”).
     The core of his painting is color. Here is what the artist says about this: “The painting is a spot. The painting is a repository of large patches of color, sometimes breaking up into a mosaic, and other times gathering from the pieces of a stained glass window. The spots have a strict hierarchy. The main color of the fragment is surrounded by supporting, reinforcing, sagging, blurry boundaries, that do not let it break into a scream. Color, like the pianist in a silent movie, sculpts the emotional content of a painting. The plot is often just an excuse, subtitles, or tickers, which are sometimes unread …”
     There is another important element in his works – the horizon, as a spatial coordinate. “The horizon, which is linearly hard and clear, is one of the main characters in my paintings. The horizon of the table, the horizon of the room, the horizon of the landscape, low or high, defines the boundaries of the characters’ actions.” The location of this line can change the author’s tone to influence the emotional timbre of the sound of the canvas.
    Invented by the artist, the “color world, whose walls are no thicker than a primed canvas” is warm, clear, fragile and enigmatic. Meeting with its inhabitants is fascinating. Their actions, though strange at first glance, may cause a smile, compassion, and may give food for thought and open within them new hidden meanings, in tune with our times. Sometimes the very name of the painting pushes us towards this (“Oknograf”, “Green Tree”). Each painting of Andrew Shustov is a small fragment of his special artistic feeling, absorbing the entire kaleidoscope of life experience, reasoning, imagination and fantasy, imprinted in a variety of fleeting forms and views. Together, they form a picturesque artist’s universe. And each of them, “continues until the corner of the canvas receives the signature of someone who is so similar to brightly dressed men with beards.”

by Marina Abramova,
art critic, 
member of the Union of Artists of the Russian Federation.
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“Onion”  Oil on Canvas. (50 x 80 cm)
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“…the glance towards objects, as a source of information revealing color harmony and rhythmical conflicts, is about the meaning and fate of the material world.  All of this is skillfully assembled by artist Andrey Shustov into a short story by the name of “still life”. A story which is calm in form, yet extremely intense and vivid emotionally.” 

Catherine Costes, columnist of the “Luxe Immo” magazine.

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Andrey Shustov was born in 1963, lives and works in Naberezhnye Chelny. He graduated from the Art-Graphic Department of Yelabuga State Pedagogical Institute (1989, with honors). Numerous meetings with the artist Yuri Larin (Larin Yuri Nikolayevich, 1936 b., painter, Moscow) significantly influenced Andrey Shustov’s artistic work, shaping a new understanding and approach to painting.

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EXHIBITIONS

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Painting by Andrey Shustov in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2014.  (Paris)

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Painting by Andrey Shustov in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2012.  (Paris)
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Russian spelling: Художник Андрей Шустов, (Набережные Челны)

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Artist Givi Siproshvili, (Ryazan)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “ART CAPITAL” 2012 – 2015

I remember as a student, I just could not get the form of the model in drawing. Erasing the paper until holes appeared, I could not achieve integrity. The details were too distinguished and persistently jumped in foreground.

Soon a new drawing teacher came to us, a young artist by the name of Levan Tsutskiridze, who watching my torment, laughed, came up to me, and with a few lines completed the drawing. I looked at him in astonishment and exclaimed: “It’s that simple? Just two minutes?”

Over the years, as I accumulated comprehensive experience in the work, I always remember with a quiet smile my naive conclusion: “How it is simple!”

Givi Siproshvili for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

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“Always wanted to show the character and state of the soul”

  Interview of the artist Givi Siproshvili for the “Russian Art & Paris” journal.

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RA&P:  – Givi Iraklievich, the twentieth century has already become history. What is most memorable for you?

Givi Siproshvili:  – Looking back, it seems to me that the worst event was the fall of the Soviet Union. On the other hand, countries received their independence, and people their freedom. This includes the freedom to move around the world, and the happiness of developing an identity. This is wonderful!

RA&P:  – Will the artists of the twentieth century influence the development of visual art in the future?

Givi Siproshvili:  – In my opinion, not only old classical masters influence the formation of the relations with art. Artists such as Picasso, Dali, Malevich, Kandinsky, and Chagall will remain in demand in the future. I think that in modern day Russia, there are many outstanding artists, who will in the near future attain a worthy place in the world stage.

RA&P:  – You have created colorful and memorable imagery. Is it possible to view your creative work as a continuation of the traditions of Bosch and Bruegel?

Givi Siproshvili:  – To be honest, I always wanted my works to show the character and state of the human soul; this is probably where the influence of old masters on my work is visible. Many of my characters are fictitious, but arise from everyday observations in life, from live sketches.

RA&P:  – You have many works of the portrait genre. Which would you like to note?

Givi Siproshvili:  – I received greater joy from the portrait “Einstein”. I believe that in this work, I was able to convey a sense of purpose, energy, and the freedom of thought of a scientist, qualities which would help him make many discoveries. Of my recent works, in my opinion, interest arises towards the work named “New Neighbor”. This painting depicts the personality of the character and the relationship between two neighbors. Similarly, I have a dream to paint a portrait of the great Georgian singer Nani Bregvadze, but this dream still remains a dream.

RA&P:  – Have their been failures in your long artistic career? And, to the contrary, which works do you consider the most meaningful?

Givi Siproshvili:  – Life had rises as well as falls. One of these falls occurred when most of my completed works were stolen, around seventy paintings prepared for an exhibition. The crisis lasted for almost ten years, my paintbrushes had a good rest. But afterwards, little by little, everything returned to normal. Among the most interesting of my works, I consider the painting “Trinity”.

RA&P:  – There are many female faces on your canvases. Which women attract you in life?

Givi Siproshvili:  – I like all women, without exception. In every woman has her own zest.©

On June 25, 2012 by internet from Georgia.
Copyright by Russian Art & Paris.

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ON EARTH AND IN HEAVEN
Why has it long been assumed that Russians and Georgians have much in common? These days, when relations between Russia and Georgia are minimal, Georgia lives in the heart of even those who have never been there. At fault here are the artists and the “deep and burning passion of a northerner for the south” as art critic and artist Alexander Benois wrote in the early 20th century. Artists never have easy fates, and the year of Givi Iraklievich Siproshvili’s birth – 1940, speaks for itself. In his seventies, the artist had to move to Russia, and not from any attraction towards moving. Growing up on the warm, bright, and gently land of Georgia, the artist does not separate himself from its culture, he is part of it; part of it in both past and present, he professes her moral laws, the high degree of his national temperament does not diminish with age.
•  In view of sad circumstances, there are almost no works of his from the 70’s through 90’s, but a review of his works from the 2000’s gives a vivid understanding of the creative and life restlessness, his constant search for ways of beauty and truth. This is the search of a wise man and mature master. In no sense is he associated with the speculative and hasty search of his own “I”. In the creative way of this artist, one can feel the Eastern self-sufficiency of a person of an ancient culture.
•  The earliest of his works – “Spring. Schoolgirl”, “Clown”, and “Echo” have varying pictorial and stylistic manners. They can contingently be called the starting points of several artistic cycles. Despite the difference in objectives, these works are united by the interaction of space and shape. The space of the artist’s painting is always tense, saturated; seems that as if by itself, it sculpts or carves the image. The space of the picture is formative, within it are new and unknown possibilities of representationalism, potential existences of shape, and the seed of its development.
•  The artist’s palette can be as exceptionally colorful (“First Kiss”) as ascetically-restrained (“Veteran”, “Refugees of Abkhazia”). In these works, the theme of which is painfully experienced by the artist, the land and the people make up a single whole, a single flesh. The people, leaving or dying, dissolve and remain in it. The pictures Givi Siproshvili contain many details that are connecting threads between the temporal and the eternal, between the past and the future. The painting “When the Call Will Ring” is bitterly poetic and bright, where the transcendental world is attractive and luminous. Yet keeping its soul, the earthly sprout is even more brightly luminous. “Pirosmani’s Death” is inherently as much of a self-portrait as the “Self-Portrait. Hunting”, as if they are both fashioned from a single colorful dough. Self-portrait is also quietly present in purely formal solutions, such as “Melancholy”. With that said, the distant past, the real world, and the imaginary world permeate the artist’s soul, and become its imprint on the canvas.
•  The technical side of the works of Givi Siproshvili is astonishing due to its wide diversity: somewhere it’s a large colorful plane, laid out with a palette knife (“Night Butterflies”), somewhere it’s a malleable, ductile smear, simulating the shape (“Evening Bells”). In some works there is a hard granular texture with colorful backings, embossing, scratching; it becomes precious and requires just a fine touch of a paintbrush for the birth of an image (“Rest,” “Roses”). Many techniques are the unique invention of the artist: “Kakhetian”, “Doctor and Patient”, “Two”. The artist’s work with texture gives his paintings a unique preciousness.
•  No matter how interesting the techniques may be, neither they nor the craftiness makes the paintings of the artist Givi Siproshvili a striking phenomenon in visual arts. In his works – philosophical parables, live landscapes, fantasies, and still life – there is an idea, a soul, a broad emotional palette, and most importantly, love, without which the secret of art cannot be born.

by Irina Protopopova, art critic,
member of the Union of Artists of the Russian Federation.

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“Einstein” Oil on Canvas. (50 x 50 cm)

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Siproshvili  Givi  Iraklievich, a painter and graphic artist, was born in 1940 in Georgia. In 1971 he graduated from Tbilisi Academy of Fine Arts with a degree in painting. His teachers at the Academy of Fine Arts were well known artists as such Kornelli Sanadze, Koki Makharadze, Lapiashvili, Ucha Japaridze. Since 1974, he has been a member of the Union of Artists of the USSR and Georgia. Since 2000, he has been a member of International Federation of Artists (UNESCO).
In 2009 he received the “Talent and Vocation” award from the international alliance “Peacemaker” in the field of culture and of art. In 2009, he was recognized as an honorary citizen of the town of Forte dei Marmi in Italy, where he represented Russian art at the festival of Russian art and film “Maestro”, and was awarded a medal by the mayor.

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EXHIBITIONS

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Painting by Givi Siproshvili in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art Capital” 2015. (Paris)

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Painting by Givi Siproshvili in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2014. Painting “Attraction” received “Prix Reijinsha-2014″ award.

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Painting by Givi Siproshvili in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2012.  (Paris)

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Russian spelling: Художник Гиви Сипрошвили, (Рязань)

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Artist Rinat Sharafutdinov, (Magnitogorsk)

THE EXHIBITOR OF THE SALON “ART CAPITAL” 2012 – 2015

The workshop of the artist Rinat Sharafutdinov is located in the heart of the Magnitogorsk town. Within it is bright,  quiet,  and comfortable,  with a pleasant smell of paint. There are books about his favorite artists on the shelves,  and neatly stored canvases on the mezzanine.
Everything here predisposes a person to serious thoughtful work, which does not tolerate haste and disorder, external as well as internal.  In a small industrial town in the Urals, located on the border between Europe and Asia, away from prying eyes and amidst silence, the art of Rinat Sharafutdinov was born. Federico Fellini once made a remarkable assertion that “true geniuses can only arise from provinces since the lack of impressions during childhood forces people to compensate for it with their imagination, and the greed of perception becomes hypertrophied in size”…
      I hope that the readers of online journal  “Russian Art & Paris”  will be interested in getting acquainted with the works of an artist from Russia’s heartland. A new attitude, appropriate for our time, in which the territories of different cultures, civilizations,  and religions are common to all of mankind, allows for the expansion of the horizons of art space. By enriching his own creative possibilities, any talented artist within this space can bring new life and contents, corresponding to his internal “I”,  into old traditions.   Rinat Sharafutdinov, with an inimitable individual style, is such an artist.

Marina Abramova    
June 12, 2012
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Rinat Sharafutdinov is a colorful and extraordinary artist. Though he was educated in the monumental genre, he has fruitful work in the classical genres of landscape, portrait, and still life. Knowing well the “grammar” of his profession, he concentrates his creative research on the “architectonics” of painting. The rational, clearly thought out, scenic system of an artist is not just an “intellectual game.” It is a search for harmony, of both color and structure. In his compositions, everything is thought through: expressiveness of lines, forms, appropriateness of rhythmic repetitions, balance, organization of space through color, interaction of all the painting elements as a single and self- sufficient organism. On every specific canvas, the presence of a genuine poetic tone can be felt. Amidst this tone, the artist possesses a special natural feeling of decoration.
•  As one of the forms of understanding the surrounding world, the art of Rinat Sharafutdinov suggests not so much the reflection of visual interest, as the desire to escape from the everyday mundane standard to see color and shape as an absolute aesthetic category.
•  Landscape compositions with a clear decorative attitude are subject to a special logic of constructing space. Much attention is paid to the expressiveness of the silhouette, the interaction of color and shape, planarity, and volume. Textured and energized painting of the foreground is often balanced by the straight line of the horizon. An artist’s glance is capable of a complex panoramic vision. The small figures of people, at first glance, are of secondary importance, however their presence creates a “pastoral corner” of tranquility among the commotion of color, forming live moving simplified volumes. The chromaticity of the palette reaches the limit of sensation, turning into a celebration of red, blue, or green. When compositions are made with a single soloing color, painting begins to tangibly sound. The viewer’s imagination is activated, engaging in some magical supersensible reality where there is no concept of time.
•  In works on the eternal theme of the relationship between man and woman, color is brought to the highest level of richness and emotional tension. It becomes an open structural metaphor and carries with it an important burden: to symbolize passion, love. The form becomes a sign, and the space becomes even more conventional.
•  For an artist, it is characteristic to convey a variety of emotional states: from thoughtful and quiet sadness, to frank sensuality and expression. His works are attractive not only for the poetic insight into the essence of the visual world, but also for the painting technique, the complex structure of the paint layer, the variety of “precious” colors (silver, golden, bronze, etc.), mystifyingly shimmering in color and light. In his search an artist does not limit himself to the reflections of the observed. He transforms natures forms, likening them to a symbol-sign, and connects components of the space into a single volume, reaching the utmost clarity in his compositional decisions. The artist’s main creative principle is treating the art form as an ever-changing reality.

by Marina Abramova,
The chief curator of the Magnitogorsk City Gallery, art critic, 
member of the Union of Artists of the Russian Federation.
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The picture in the text:
“Two Graces in hat” (a fragment)
Pastel on paper.  65 x 50 cm.

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Rinat Sharafutdinov was born in the city of Magnitogorsk in 1959.  During 1975-1979 he studied at the Art College in the city of Sverdlovsk. In 1987 he graduated from Moscow Art-Industrial College (the former Stroganoff College) where he studied at the department of monumental and decorative art in the studio of professor A.Orlovsky.  Rinat was also a student of professor F.Voloshko and professor S.Godyna.  Rinat Sharafutdinov  has been a member of the Union of Artists of the Russian Federation since 1993. 
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EXHIBITIONS

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Painting by Rinat Sharafutdinov in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art Capital” 2015.  (Paris)

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Painting by Rinat Sharafutdinov in the exhibition hall of the Salon “Art en Capital” 2012.  (Paris)

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Russian spelling: Художник Ринат Шарафутдинов, (Магнитогорск)

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Artist Alexander Grishkevich, (Minsk)

THE “RUSSIAN ART & PARIS” INTRODUCING:   

Out of the many teachers in    my life, there was one, who did not satisfy the direct meaning   of the word.  Nevertheless   there are two things, possibly the most important for me, that   I heard from him.

First. Your work should look impressive from a distance. Therefore the compositional decision should be clear and precise. The sketch should be made the size of a matchbox.  In this size already,  the main artistic idea of two-dimensional space should be readable. Second. There are no objects in the painting.  The painting has components.  A cup and a cup’s shadow are of equal value in the painting. Today, for me, the cup’s shadow has greater meaning than the cup itself.

Alexander Grishkevich for the readers of the ”Russian Art & Paris”.

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Maksimilian Voloshin has poetic comparisons that “artists are the eyes of mankind” and “the artist, first of all, is the musician”. Every artist, as is known, has his own view on the world, and his own music sounds in his heart. Before Alexander Grishkevich is emerging a completely different picture of the world, different from what we are used to, and there is music, which his heart responds to. The artist is realizing these feelings in the picturesque compositions. He is transforming the real objects into the ideal ones. Before us emerges an image of the Other World, which often differs strikingly from the familiar one. These images are the product of another self-consciousness, other impressions and other perceptions. And consequently the aim of the viewer consists in understanding this “otherness”. For the purpose of coming closer in any measure to comprehending his attitude, it is necessary to understand how he realizes space and time, the real world and the invented world, and at last, his own person. Even the most varied aspects of the artistic picture of the world, are ultimately directly or indirectly interconnected. In the achievement of such synthesis, I believe there is a hidden goal that an artist sets for himself. It is a leitmotif of his figurative-art approach. This approach is not always distinctly realized or clearly formulated by him. Sometimes it remains like an unattainable horizon, which the artist aspires to. However, he always leaves us a reference point, which although not always clear, is helpful in reaching the path of understanding.
•  Alexander Grishkevich is realizing, that he cannot accurately depict even part of a world which has passed. This “depicting” is inevitably fraught with inevitably fraught with distortions and modernization. Therefore in his works, everything is sufficiently concrete and clearly expressed. The artist builds his ideal world on the basis of real visual impressions. This world is sterile and clean; its forms, light and color relations are precise and verified. There is no place for accident and chaos. Everything is subordinated to the author’s logic and harmony. In this ideal world there is no place for the human being, he is not the participant of an event, he is only the observer. In spite of its reality, this world is fantastic by its inherent nature. Within it, by the will of the artist, objects obtain geometrical structure, while remaining natural formations as well.
•  In his compositions, although they are painted in a realistic manner, color exists as though by itself. It is self-sufficient at heart and is perceived as an independent reality even though it is limited to a contour of concrete subjects. There are precise color spot borders of subject forms of the picture with various voice-frequency shades where color gets independent sounding. Color has texture and depth, it mysteriously flickers, strengthening the unreality represented. The surface of the picture has expressive qualities, it is the creation of the artist, and simultaneously with color, is the nature of the picture. In each concrete case, color for A.Grishkevich is not simply paint, it is something living with figurative and poetic language, that is capable to express an essence of the artist. He is improvising, grouping color spots, giving these graphic components their forms, which are dictated to him by his imagination and vision. A.Grishkevich’s color forms are firm and constant. There is no display of external dynamics but you can feel the latent pressure by just looking at them. In this connection we can understand that the drawing is very important for him, where both line and contour express his feelings as much as color. Compositions are often repeated, but other color decision makes them different with regards to the figurative and emotional perception. When we are standing in front of his pictures we are free to invent the images, to change the color decision of a picture, and to transform the elements of a composition. In doing so, it becomes our imagination, which may be rather far removed from the artist’s imagination, but nevertheless called forth by his painting.
•  The canvas is a space where the artist lives, displaying himself and his world regardless of what he paints. Painting is a live dialogue of the artist with a surface of the canvas, carrying him into another world, into another measure. The basis of the picturesque language for A.Grishkevich is the two-dimensional plane awoken by the color and impressions of a diverse, multifaceted life. He is very rational and strict, not allowing the art statement to be spontaneous or emotionally ingenuous. The picture for him is an exit from three-dimensional space into a two-dimensional one. The feeling of a surface and the feeling of color are the mysterious beginnings, which determine the talent of the painter. The artist transfers himself from life’s macrocosm to the microcosm of the picture on a surface of a canvas. A game of shades, lines, planes, forms, volumes, and texture is inherent to the artist’s painting. This is the goal of his art, though ultimately the main aspiration is to make us better than we are.

by Valery Zhuk, Ph.D. in Art History
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Alexander Grishkevich was born in Molodechno, Republic of Belarus, in 1961. He recieved his professional education in Minsk Art College named after A. Glebov (1981)  and the Belarusian State Theatre and Art Institute, now the Belarusian Academy of Arts (1987). The artist trained at the creative academic studios of the USSR Academy of Arts, under the guidance of academician M.Savitsky (1991-1994).  Alexander Grishkevich is a member of the Artists’ Union of Belarus (1996) 
Since 1984, he has participated in art exhibitions and competitions.  The works of artist Alexander Grishkevich are in the National Art Museum of Belarus, the Museum of Modern Art (Minsk, Belarus), the Art Gallery of Svetlogorsk (Belarus), in the Unechskoy Art Gallery (Russia), and in the funds of the Ministry of culture of the Republic of Belarus.  
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Russian spelling: Художник Александр Гришкевич (Минск)

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